50 Shades of Dark

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"There is a lot of talk about the Dark Web these days, including how cyber criminals use it to spread malware, leak intellectual property, and publish user account credentials.

Using open source intelligence (OSINT), our team explored the Surface, Deep, and Dark parts of the Web and investigated the links between them.

Download this white paper to learn:
What the Dark, Deep, and Surface Web really are and why your information security team should care. How stolen credit card information, credentials, and even exploit kits are marketed. How OSINT sheds light on the darker parts of the Web to help identify malicious activity."

Spotlight

Genetec

Genetec develops open-platform software, hardware and cloud-based services for the physical security and public safety industry. Its flagship product, Security Center, unifies IP-based video surveillance, access control and automatic license plate recognition (ALPR) into one platform. A global innovator since 1997, Genetec is headquartered in Montreal, Canada, and serves enterprise and government organizations via an integrated network of resellers, integrators and consultants in over 80 countries.

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DATA SECURITY

MERGING AND SORTING FILES IN LINUX: EASIER THAN YOU THINK

Article | November 24, 2020

There are several reasons to choose Linux over other operating systems such as Windows and macOS. Linux is an open-source, secure, and very lightweight operating system consuming minimal system resources. It also has huge community support and has a ton of distros (variants) to choose from. While we have already posted a bunch of articles on simple file handling methods in Linux, sending email from the terminal, and more, we are going to walk you through the simple yet efficient process of merging and sorting files in Linux. Just like with any other operation in Linux, there are several ways you can sort and merge the files in Linux. Choosing which method to use solely depends on the user and based on what needs to be accomplished. In this article, we will show you some easy yet powerful file sorting and merging methods in Linux while pointing out the differences and importance of each method. Cat Cat is one of the easiest and simple commands in Linux that can combine multiple files into one. All you have to do is list all the files that you wish to merge into a single file along with the new file name you wish to create. If a file with the name of the final output already exists, then it will be overwritten by the one being created. Here is a very simple implementation of cat command. $ cat file1 file2 file3 file4 > Newfile However, if you wish to append information from multiple files into an already existing file, you can use ">>" instead of ">." Below is an example $ cat file1 file2 file3 file4 >> Newfile The cat command can also be used in many ways. It is also one of the most flexible and simple ways of reading the content of the file. To view the content of a file called file1, simply use the below command. $cat file1 Join Join is another command to merge the data of multiple files. While it is as easy and simple as the cat command is, it has a catch. Unlike cat, join cannot just simple combine the data of multiple files. Instead, the command allows users to merge the content of multiple files based on a common field. For instance, consider that two files need to be combined. One file contains names, whereas the other file contains IDs, and the join command can be used to combine both these files in a way that the names and their corresponding IDs appear in the same line. However, users need to make sure that the data in both these files have the common key field with which they will be joined. There are several reasons to choose Linux over other operating systems such as Windows and macOS. Linux is an open-source, secure, and very lightweight operating system consuming minimal system resources. It also has huge community support and has a ton of distros (variants) to choose from. While we have already posted a bunch of articles on simple file handling methods in Linux, sending email from the terminal, and more, we are going to walk you through the simple yet efficient process of merging and sorting files in Linux. Just like with any other operation in Linux, there are several ways you can sort and merge the files in Linux. Choosing which method to use solely depends on the user and based on what needs to be accomplished. In this article, we will show you some easy yet powerful file sorting and merging methods in Linux while pointing out the differences and importance of each method. azure linux Shutterstock Cat Cat is one of the easiest and simple commands in Linux that can combine multiple files into one. All you have to do is list all the files that you wish to merge into a single file along with the new file name you wish to create. If a file with the name of the final output already exists, then it will be overwritten by the one being created. Here is a very simple implementation of cat command. $ cat file1 file2 file3 file4 > Newfile However, if you wish to append information from multiple files into an already existing file, you can use ">>" instead of ">." Below is an example $ cat file1 file2 file3 file4 >> Newfile The cat command can also be used in many ways. It is also one of the most flexible and simple ways of reading the content of the file. To view the content of a file called file1, simply use the below command. $cat file1 Join Join is another command to merge the data of multiple files. While it is as easy and simple as the cat command is, it has a catch. Unlike cat, join cannot just simple combine the data of multiple files. Instead, the command allows users to merge the content of multiple files based on a common field. For instance, consider that two files need to be combined. One file contains names, whereas the other file contains IDs, and the join command can be used to combine both these files in a way that the names and their corresponding IDs appear in the same line. However, users need to make sure that the data in both these files have the common key field with which they will be joined. Syntax $join [OPTION] FILE1 FILE2 Example: Assume file1.txt contains ... 1 Aarav 2 Aashi 3 Sukesh And, file2.txt contains ... 1 101 2 102 3 103 The command ... $ join file1.txt file2.txt will result in: 1 Aarav 101 2 Aashi 102 3 Sukesh 103 Note that by default, the join command takes the first column as the key to join multiple files. Also, if you wish to store the final data of the two files joined into another file, you can use this command: $ cat file1.txt file2.txt > result.txt Paste The paste command is used to join multiple files horizontally by performing parallel merging. The command outputs the lines from each file specified, separated by a tab as a delimiter by default to the standard output. Assume there is a file called numbers.txt containing numbers from 1 to 4. And there are another two files called countries.txt and capital.txt containing four countries and their corresponding capitals, respectively. The command below will join the information of these three files and will be separated by a tab space as a delimiter. $ paste numbers.txt countries.txt capital.txt However, you can also specify any delimiter by adding a delimiter option to the above command. For example, if we need the delimited to be "-" you can use this command: $ paste -d “-” numbers.txt countries.txt capital.txt Sort The sort command in Linux, as the name suggests, is used to sort a file as well as arrange the records in a particular order. Sort can also be paired with multiple other Linux commands such as cat by simply joining the two commands using a pipe "|" symbol. For instance, if you wish to merge multiple files, sort them alphabetically and store them in another file, you can use this command: $ cat file1.txt file2.txt file3.txt | sort > finalfile.txt There are several reasons to choose Linux over other operating systems such as Windows and macOS. Linux is an open-source, secure, and very lightweight operating system consuming minimal system resources. It also has huge community support and has a ton of distros (variants) to choose from. While we have already posted a bunch of articles on simple file handling methods in Linux, sending email from the terminal, and more, we are going to walk you through the simple yet efficient process of merging and sorting files in Linux. Just like with any other operation in Linux, there are several ways you can sort and merge the files in Linux. Choosing which method to use solely depends on the user and based on what needs to be accomplished. In this article, we will show you some easy yet powerful file sorting and merging methods in Linux while pointing out the differences and importance of each method. azure linux Shutterstock Cat Cat is one of the easiest and simple commands in Linux that can combine multiple files into one. All you have to do is list all the files that you wish to merge into a single file along with the new file name you wish to create. If a file with the name of the final output already exists, then it will be overwritten by the one being created. Here is a very simple implementation of cat command. $ cat file1 file2 file3 file4 > Newfile However, if you wish to append information from multiple files into an already existing file, you can use ">>" instead of ">." Below is an example $ cat file1 file2 file3 file4 >> Newfile The cat command can also be used in many ways. It is also one of the most flexible and simple ways of reading the content of the file. To view the content of a file called file1, simply use the below command. $cat file1 Join Join is another command to merge the data of multiple files. While it is as easy and simple as the cat command is, it has a catch. Unlike cat, join cannot just simple combine the data of multiple files. Instead, the command allows users to merge the content of multiple files based on a common field. For instance, consider that two files need to be combined. One file contains names, whereas the other file contains IDs, and the join command can be used to combine both these files in a way that the names and their corresponding IDs appear in the same line. However, users need to make sure that the data in both these files have the common key field with which they will be joined. Syntax $join [OPTION] FILE1 FILE2 Example: Assume file1.txt contains ... 1 Aarav 2 Aashi 3 Sukesh And, file2.txt contains ... 1 101 2 102 3 103 The command ... $ join file1.txt file2.txt will result in: 1 Aarav 101 2 Aashi 102 3 Sukesh 103 Note that by default, the join command takes the first column as the key to join multiple files. Also, if you wish to store the final data of the two files joined into another file, you can use this command: $ cat file1.txt file2.txt > result.txt Paste The paste command is used to join multiple files horizontally by performing parallel merging. The command outputs the lines from each file specified, separated by a tab as a delimiter by default to the standard output. Assume there is a file called numbers.txt containing numbers from 1 to 4. And there are another two files called countries.txt and capital.txt containing four countries and their corresponding capitals, respectively. The command below will join the information of these three files and will be separated by a tab space as a delimiter. $ paste numbers.txt countries.txt capital.txt However, you can also specify any delimiter by adding a delimiter option to the above command. For example, if we need the delimited to be "-" you can use this command: $ paste -d “-” numbers.txt countries.txt capital.txt There are several other options available for the paste command, and more information can be found here. Sort The sort command in Linux, as the name suggests, is used to sort a file as well as arrange the records in a particular order. Sort can also be paired with multiple other Linux commands such as cat by simply joining the two commands using a pipe "|" symbol. For instance, if you wish to merge multiple files, sort them alphabetically and store them in another file, you can use this command: $ cat file1.txt file2.txt file3.txt | sort > finalfile.txt The above command is going to merge the files, sort the overall content, and then store it in the finalfile.txt You can also use the sort command to simply sort a single file containing information: $ sort file.txt The command above does not change or modify the data in file.txt and is, therefore, just for displaying the sorted data on the console. There are several other ways of merging and sorting files and data in the Linux operating system. What makes Linux unique is its ability to pair up multiple commands to achieve its purpose. Once users start to make themselves acquainted with these commands, it can save a lot of time and effort while performing tasks with more precision and efficiency.

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Wormable, Unpatched Microsoft Bug Threatens Corporate LANs

Article | November 24, 2020

Microsoft is warning on a wormable, unpatched remote code-execution vulnerability in the Microsoft Server Message Block protocol – the same protocol that was targeted by the infamous WannaCry ransomware in 2017.The critical bug (CVE-2020-0796) affects Windows 10 and Windows Server 2019, and was not included in Microsoft’s Patch Tuesday release this week. The bug can be found in version 3.1.1 of Microsoft’s SMB file-sharing system. SMB allows multiple clients to access shared folders and can provide a rich playground for malware when it comes to lateral movement and client-to-client infection. This was played out in version 1 of SMB back in 2017, when the WannaCry ransomware used the NSA-developed EternalBlue SMB exploit to self-propagate rapidly around the world.

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Critical Gaps Remain in Defense Department Weapons System Cybersecurity

Article | November 24, 2020

While the U.S. military is the most effective fighting force in the modern era, it struggles with the cybersecurity of its most advanced weapons systems. In times of crisis and conflict, it is critical that the United States preserve its ability to defend and surge when adversaries employ cyber capabilities to attack weapons systems and functions. Today, the very thing that makes these weapons so lethal is what makes them vulnerable to cyberattacks: an interconnected system of software and networks. Continued automation and connectivity are the backbone of the Department of Defense’s warfighting capabilities, with almost every weapons system connected in some capacity. Today, these interdependent networks are directly linked to the U.S. military’s ability to carry out missions successfully, allowing it to gain informational advantage, exercise global command and control, and conduct long-range strikes. An example of such a networked system is the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, which the Air Force chief of staff, Gen. David Goldfein, once called “a computer that happens to fly.” Underpinning this platform’s unrivaled capability is more than 8 million lines of software code.

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Guide to Cloud Security Certification: Which Ones Are the Best of the Best?

Article | November 24, 2020

As your organization looks to move to cloud computing, security certification will become more critical. Cloud solutions have unique security considerations that are different from an on-premise solution. IT professionals that are managing these solutions should be well-versed in multi-layered protection, encryption, monitoring, and more. Not only is certification important for your own IT staff, but it should also be part of your recruiting strategy. Experience combined with certifications can be invaluable foclr protecting your cloud environment. You want to ensure that the data you store in the cloud is protected from security threats.

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Spotlight

Genetec

Genetec develops open-platform software, hardware and cloud-based services for the physical security and public safety industry. Its flagship product, Security Center, unifies IP-based video surveillance, access control and automatic license plate recognition (ALPR) into one platform. A global innovator since 1997, Genetec is headquartered in Montreal, Canada, and serves enterprise and government organizations via an integrated network of resellers, integrators and consultants in over 80 countries.

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