A Survey on Color Password Authentication to Avoid Shoulder Surfing Attack

| April 26, 2016

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In shoulder surfing attack, an unauthorized user can fully or partially observe the login session. To avoid this attack, the authors propose an intelligent user interface, known as color pass. This proposed system based on partially observable attacker model, i.e. the attacker can partially observe the login procedure. Classical PIN entry is a popular scheme because it greatly balances the usability as well as security aspects of a system. Color pass interface is easy and safe for any genuine user.

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Indus Valley Partners

Indus Valley Partners is a leading provider of technology solutions and services to the alternative investment industry. Founded in 2000, Indus Valley Partners client base includes 25 of the top 50 global hedge funds. Managing more than $825 billion these clients represent over 25% of global hedge fund AUM.

OTHER ARTICLES

Single Layers Of Security Aren’t Enough To Protect Your Organization’s Data

Article | May 3, 2020

Next to your employees, your organization’s data is its most important resource. A data breach can devastate an organization’s finances and reputation for years. According to the 2019 Cost of a Data Breach Report, conducted by Ponemon Institute, the average total cost of a data breach in the U.S. is close to $4 million, and the average cost per lost data record is $150. Hackers are more sophisticated than ever and the value of data seems to rise every day. In fact, McAfee believes that 92% of organizations unknowingly have credentials for sale on the Dark Web or “dark net.”

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The Coronavirus is Already Taking Effect on Cyber Security– This is How CISOs Should Prepare

Article | March 18, 2020

Cynet has revealed new data, showing that the Coronavirus now has a significant impact on information security and that the crisis is actively exploited by threat actors. The Coronavirus is hitting hard on the world’s economy, creating a high volume of uncertainty within organizations. Cynet has revealed new data, showing that the Coronavirus now has a significant impact on information security and that the crisis is actively exploited by threat actors. In light of these insights, Cynet has shared a few ways to best prepare for the Coronavirus derived threat landscape and provides a solution (learn more here) to protect employees that are working from home with their personal computers, because of the coronavirus. Cynet identifies two main trends – attacks that aim to steal remote user credentials, and weaponized email attacks:

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Here’s What Universities Need to Know About Cyber-Attacks

Article | June 1, 2021

Over the last year, the education delivery model has changed rapidly. Universities have learnt to operate entirely remotely and now that learning may resume in person, a hybrid education model will likely continue. The transition from physical to online models happened so quickly that it left many IT networks exposed to serious harm from outside forces. With a hybrid model, there is likely a widening attack surface area. A recent spate of attacks suggests that cyber-criminals are taking notice of the seemingly infinite weaknesses in learning centers defenses. But why? One of the primary reasons is that universities operate large corporate-sized networks, but without the budgets to match. Add to that, teachers and students aren’t given training to use and connect their technology in a safe way. To avoid falling victim to devastating cyber-attacks which often have dire consequences, we share three lessons universities need to quickly take on board. Your Research is Valuable to Cyber-Criminals There is a hefty price tag on some of the research conducted by universities, which makes it particularly attractive to cyber-criminals. The University of Oxford’s Division of Structural Biology was targeted in February by hackers snooping around, potentially in search of information about the vaccine the university has worked on with AstraZeneca. It’s not just gangs of cyber-criminals targeting research facilities, last year Russian state backed hackers were accused by official sources in the US, UK and Canada of trying to steal COVID-19 vaccine and treatment research. With world-leading research hidden in the networks of universities, its unsurprising that last year over half (54%) of universities surveyed said that they had reported a breach to the ICO (Information Commissioner’s Office). The research conducted by many UK universities makes them an attractive target for financially motivated cyber-criminals and state-sponsored hackers in search of valuable intellectual property. To add insult to injury, ransomware attackers are doubling their opportunity for pay off by selling off the stolen information to the highest bidder, causing a serious headache for the victims while potentially increasing the value of their pay-out. Personal Information of Students and Staff Can Easily Fall into the Wrong Hands Based on tests of UK university defenses, hackers were able to obtain ‘high-value’ data within two hours in every case. In many cases, successful cyber-attacks are followed by not only a ransom note demanding payment for the recovery of frozen or stolen data, but also the added threat of sharing any sensitive stolen information with the public.

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Data Privacy Problem: Are Home Genealogy Kits a Security Threat?

Article | March 2, 2020

Surprising news recently emerged from the personal genetics business. The two leading direct-to-consumer companies in North America, 23andMe and Ancestry.com, announced within a week of each other that they were laying off a significant proportion of their workforce as a result of a steep drop in sales. This past Christmas, the sales of testing kits were expected to take a sharp hike — nothing says family like a gift that says prove it. But sales plummeted instead. According to Second Measure, a company that analyzes website sales, 23andMe’s business plummeted 54 per cent and Ancestry kits sales declined 38 per cent. Industry executives, market watchers and genealogists have all speculated about the causes of the drop in consumer interest. Market saturation? Early adopters tapped out? Limited usefulness? Recession fears? Whatever the theory, everyone seems to agree on one factor: privacy concerns.

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Spotlight

Indus Valley Partners

Indus Valley Partners is a leading provider of technology solutions and services to the alternative investment industry. Founded in 2000, Indus Valley Partners client base includes 25 of the top 50 global hedge funds. Managing more than $825 billion these clients represent over 25% of global hedge fund AUM.

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