Artificial Intelligence: A new frontier in cybersecurity

| July 15, 2019

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Security experts opined that more organizations are turning up to Artificial Intelligence (AI) to shore up their security defenses against cybercrimes. Technology firm Capgemini stated that firms find AI as increasingly necessary to bolster cybersecurity. In its research, Reinventing Cybersecurity with Artificial Intelligence, Capgemini revealed that most of the technology firms are already started using AI in their cybersecurity initiatives or planning to introduce shortly. The research, which surveyed 850 senior executives from IT Information Security, Cybersecurity, and IT Operations across 10 countries, stated that three in five firms that surveyed said using AI improves the accuracy and efficiency of cyber analysts. Capgemini stated that 61 percent of enterprises surveyed said that they can’t detect breach attempts without AI technologies and 64 percent of firms said that AI lowers the cost to detect and respond to breaches.

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OTHER ARTICLES

We Need to Improve Cybersecurity Standards in Space

Article | February 27, 2020

Last month, SpaceX became the operator of the world’s largest active satellite constellation. As of the end of January, the company had 242 satellites orbiting the planet with plans to launch 42,000 over the next decade. This is part of its ambitious project to provide internet access across the globe. The race to put satellites in space is on, with Amazon, UK-based OneWeb and other companies chomping at the bit to place thousands of satellites in orbit in the coming months. These new satellites have the potential to revolutionise many aspects of everyday life – from bringing internet access to remote corners of the globe to monitoring the environment and improving global navigation systems. Amid all the fanfare, a critical danger has flown under the radar: the lack of cybersecurity standards and regulations for commercial satellites, in the US and internationally. As a scholar who studies cyber conflict, I’m keenly aware that this, coupled with satellites’ complex supply chains and layers of stakeholders, leaves them highly vulnerable to cyberattacks.

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What Does It Take to Be a Cybersecurity Professional?

Article | August 30, 2021

While eating dinner at a Fourth of July cookout last weekend, my nephew described why he had so many career options as a pilot: There’s a shortage of pilots, and many existing pilots will be retiring soon. Other current pilots need to be retrained, because they fell behind in various ways during the pandemic. New people want to get into the field, but there are many hard requirements that can’t be faked, like flying hours, or unique experience on specific aircraft. There are many job openings and everyone is hiring. My response? Sounds a lot like our current cybersecurity career field. Professionals in cyber are seeing almost the exact same things. And yes, there are many, perhaps thousands, of articles on this topic saying different things. Everyone is focused on the shortages of cyber pros and the talent issues we currently face. But how hard is it to get into a cyber career for the long term? How can someone move into a fulfilling career that will last well beyond their current role? One reason I like the pilot training comparison is that becoming an excellent cyber pro takes time and commitment. If there are any “quick wins” (with minimal preparation or training) in cybersecurity careers, they probably won’t last very long — in the same way that flying large airplanes takes years of experience. After I got home that night, I saw this article from TechRepublic proclaiming “you don’t have to be a tech expert to become a cybersecurity pro.” Here’s an excerpt: “Ning Wang: I think that we’re in a pretty bad state. No matter which source you look at, there are a lot more job openings for cybersecurity than there are qualified people to fill it. And I have worked at other security companies before Offensive Security, and I know firsthand, it is really hard to hire those people. … “You may think that you have to have so much technology background to go into security. And again, I know firsthand that is not the case. What does it take to be a great cybersecurity professional? And I think from my observation and working with people and interacting with people, they need a creative mind, a curious mind, you have to be curious about things. … “And then even if you have all of that, there’s no shortcuts. If you look at all the great people in cybersecurity, just like all the other fields, that 10,000-hour rule applies here as well.” My response? I certainly agree that advanced degrees and formal certifications are not required (although they help). Still, the 10,000-hour rule and determination are must-haves to last in the long term. Here’s what I wrote for CSO Magazine a decade ago on the topic of “Are you a security professional?”: “Many experts and organizations define a security professional based upon whether or not they have a CISSP, CISM, Master’s Degree in Information Assurance or other credentials. Or, are you in an organization or business unit with 'security' in the title? While these characteristics certainly help, my definition is much broader than that. "Why? I have seen people come and go in the security area. For example: Adam Shostack started his career as a UNIX sysadmin. Likewise, you probably know people who started in security and left, or who still have a different job title but read blogs like this one because their job includes something less than 50% information security. (That is, they wear multiple hats). Others are assigned to a security function against their will or leave a security office despite their love for the field (when a too-tempting opportunity arises). Some come back, others never will.” WHY BECOME A CYBER PRO? This CompTIA article outlines some of the top jobs in cybersecurity, with average salaries: 1. Cybersecurity Analyst $95,000 2. Cybersecurity Consultant $91,000 3. Cyber Security Manager/Administrator $105,000 4. Software Developer/Engineer $110,140* 5. Systems Engineer $90,920 6. Network Engineer/Architect $83,510* 7. Vulnerability Analyst/Penetration Tester $103,000 8. Cyber Security Specialist/Technician $92,000 9. Incident Analyst/Responder $89,000 * Salaries marked with an asterisk (*) came from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The article also walks through many of the steps regarding education, certifications and skills. Of course, there are many other great reasons to get into a cyber career beyond pay and benefits, including helping society, the fascinating changes that grow with new technology deployment, a huge need, the ability to work remotely (often), and the potential for a wide variety of relationships and global travel if desired. Becoming a CISO (or CSO) is another important role, with CISO salaries all over the map but averaging $173,740 according to Glassdoor. OTHER HELPFUL ARTICLES ON BECOMING A CYBER PRO Yes, I have written on this topic of cybersecurity careers many times over the past decade-plus. Here are a few of those articles: • “The case for taking a government cyber job: 7 recommendations to consider” • “Why Are Some Cybersecurity Professionals Not Finding Jobs?” • “Why You Should Consider a Career in Government Cyber Security” • “Play a Game - Get a Job: GCHQ’s New Tool to Recruit Cyber Talent” FINAL THOUGHTS Many people are now considering career changes as we come out of the COVID-19 pandemic. Cybersecurity is one of the hottest fields that has staying power for decades. At the same time, Bloomberg is reporting that U.S. job openings are at record levels. Also, Business Insider is offering a template to revamp your resume and get a remote job anywhere in the world. So even if the obstacles look daunting, a career in cybersecurity may be just the long-term change you are looking for. Article Orginal Source: https://www.govtech.com/blogs/lohrmann-on-cybersecurity/what-does-it-take-to-be-a-cybersecurity-professional

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How the IIoT can subdue cyber security challenges met by software adoption

Article | February 25, 2020

Matt Newton, senior portfolio marketing manager at AVEVA, discusses how IIoT can best cyber security challenges met through software adoption. According to Gartner’s 2019 Industrial IoT Platforms Magic Quadrant report, by 2023 30% of industrial enterprises will have full, on-premises deployments of IIoT platforms. IIoT platforms and software adoption is rapidly increasing – up 15% in 2019 – and this will undoubtedly continue to grow as we progress through the new decade. From enhancing operational performance to improved business processes, adopting new technology and software capabilities is vital for business success in today’s industrial sector. However, when it comes to adopting software and technology, integrating new systems with existing legacy systems in the industry can be a challenge.

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DOCUMENT PROOFREADING AND EDITING SERVICES FOR YOUR CYBERSECURITY POLICY

Article | June 14, 2021

Recent data breaches, ransomware, and malware trends have increased the need to protect customer privacy. Regardless of company size or industry, you need a cybersecurity policy to ensure cybersecurity best practices in your organization. A cybersecurity policy contains preventive measures that protect your network from cybercriminals. To ensure that your cybersecurity policy is easy to read, understand, and implement, you need cybersecurity policy document proofreading and editing services. Your cybersecurity policy spells out cybersecurity dos and don’ts drafted from industry and state regulations that your employees should follow. It states the instructions your employees should follow to prevent cyberattacks and how they should react when they notice a network security breach. This protects data, promotes customer privacy, and prevents cyber-attacks. In this article, we spell out why you need cybersecurity proofreading and editing services.

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Spotlight

ESET India

"ESET India founded in 1992, ESET is a global provider of security solutions for businesses and consumers. ESET’s flagship products ESET NOD32 Antivirus, ESET Smart Security and ESET Cybersecurity for Mac are trusted by millions of global users. ESET NOD32 Antivirus holds the world record for the number of Virus Bulletin ""VB100” Awards, and has never missed a single “In-the-Wild” worm or virus since the inception of testing in 1998. Continually evolving to face the latest threats, ESET has protected nearly all operating systems – starting with MS DOS and going through Windows, Mac OS X, Symbian and Android. Today ESET solutions protect over 100 million devices daily, including computers, laptops, smartphones, tablets and servers, no matter the operating system. Our solutions for home and business deliver real-time consistent level of protection against a vast array of existing and emerging malware."

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