CARBONITE ONLINE BACKUP Data Security Practices

| April 26, 2016

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"When you entrust valuable data to an online backup provider, you must feel confident your data is private, secure, and can be restored without corruption. Carbonite uses state-of-the-art technology, secure infrastructure, and industry-leading standard operating procedures to keep our customers’ data safely backed up and easily restorable."

Spotlight

NSHC

As one of the leading cybersecurity company of South Korea, NSHC is now the no.1 mobile security solution provider in Far East Asia, no.1 ICS/SCADA Offensive Security Service Provider in the whole of Asia, and striving further to be the top cybersecurity company in the world.

OTHER ARTICLES

Guide to Cloud Security Certification: Which Ones Are the Best of the Best?

Article | April 27, 2021

As your organization looks to move to cloud computing, security certification will become more critical. Cloud solutions have unique security considerations that are different from an on-premise solution. IT professionals that are managing these solutions should be well-versed in multi-layered protection, encryption, monitoring, and more. Not only is certification important for your own IT staff, but it should also be part of your recruiting strategy. Experience combined with certifications can be invaluable foclr protecting your cloud environment. You want to ensure that the data you store in the cloud is protected from security threats.

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Cybersecurity Product Marketing Strategy

Article | July 20, 2021

People dealing in cybersecurity knows that it is a challenging market. A specifically designed business model is not there in cybersecurity on which you can market products and services. Over the past years, the B2B Cyber Security industry has witnessed immense growth and will continue in the future. The growth can be attributed to many aspects, including growing instances of cybercrime and the emergence of interconnected devices in the IoT revolution. New security solutions are coming into the market every day. As a result, the demand for B2B digital marketersis also on the rise to keep with the unexpected growth in products, services, and competitors. To stand out from the competition, you need a sound cybersecurity product marketing strategy leveraging all digital channels. You have to focus on various productive marketing tactics to reach, engage, and nurture all your potential clients as an ongoing process with all the relevant information about business and products. For example, the B2B cloud-security service provider,IBM Security, uses paid ad campaigns and webinars, which are excellent cybersecurity product marketing strategies. They could maketheir expertise and solutions stand out from the rest of the crowd with this excellent strategy. Reading further will give you insights on how to market your cybersecurity products effectively to generate leads and boost profit. Make your Marketing Effective with Unique Content To demonstrate the effectiveness of your solutions and the significance of your cybersecurity, your company should ensure your content has real-world examples. This will make your content more influential. Apart from being data-driven and comprehensive, your content also should be unique. Credibility can be surly built up by revamping your content strategy. You can create educational content that clearly shows how your product can help solve a real-life cybersecurity attack. Then, you may back it up with independent industry reviews,case studies, etc. Instead of reusing the same content, experiment with new content that describes and solves different cyber threats and relates it with your products and solutions. The following types of content can be a practical part of your cybersecurity product marketing strategyat different points in the buyer’s journey: Blogs In every stage of the cybersecurity buyer’s journey, blogs are great for attracting prospects. Developing some evergreen and universally relevant content will be highly useful. Describing topics about cybersecurity in your blogs, such as phishing, DNS encryption, will be a great thing for clients who have just started their research and want to learn more, starting from basics. Case Studies As CNI says, the mostcritical tactic for B2B companies iscase studies. These are exemplary and the best to engage leads who are already aware of their problems and know what solutions can solve them. Videos According to HubSpot, at least once a week, 75% of executives watch work-related videos on business websites. Additionally, 59% of executives prefer watching a video over reading text. So, it’s the best strategy to include videos in your cybersecurity product marketing efforts. Explanatory videos will work the best to tell your potential cybersecurity product clients what your cybersecurity offerings are and why they could be the most valuable solution for their situations. Additionally, when you’re trying to target C-level executives, this can be a beneficial tactic. This is because they need more education regarding this. You may also utilize various statistics on cyber-attacks, loss due to cyber-attacks, recovery expenses, and the value of cybersecurity solutions. Additionally, again, providing practical and real-life examples in your video will help you make the statistics more relevant and inject a sense of urgency into the minds of your potential clients. Effective Email Marketing Strategy Education and awareness are significant barriers to selling your solutions. Due to these barriers, it can often take a reasonable amount of time for a potential lead to reach the point where they can contact a B2B sales representative or request a demo. Meanwhile, it is your time to have a tactic to nurture these leads to move them to the next level of the sales funnel. It can be an effective email marketing strategy. It is a strategic and effective way to connectto those potential leads who have not decided to purchase your products. However, with many emails in your potential client's inboxes, they may unsubscribe or delete your email if they don’t find your email content valuable and worthwhile. So make sure to analyze often and monitor your email marketing campaigns. Content, subject lines, images, and copy in your email should be practical and attractive regarding open and click-through rates. Flooding your prospects’ inbox with emails about various cyber threats they face may result in losing their interest in your emails as they may have desensitization towards your emails. Staying connected with your prospects through email marketing is an effective cybersecurityproduct marketing strategy. First, however, be mindful of how many emails you are sending to your prospects. Interactive Sessions The tremendous interactive session you can have online today with your potential client is webinars. It is an excellent way for you in the cybersecurity domain to connect with your potential leads. The interactive element is a vital part of a webinar. Q&A session at the end of each webinar makes it more interactive where the participants can ask you questions and raise queries about the topic and your services. Accumulating all those questions asked by the attendees can be an excellent starting point for creating new content to address your audience's challenges. These attendees now are interested in learning more about your products and services and the threats it protects against. They also might have engaged in some research. This means they will do further in-depth research and be more engaged with your presentation topics. Thus, it is a valuable opportunity to demonstrate other helpful content or have a CTA for demo sign-ups. You can respond to the queries of the participants in a follow-up, even if your webinar is a pre-recorded one. This effective cybersecurity product marketing tactic will help you accumulate many potential clients and take them to the next stage of the salesfunnel. Paid Campaigns Two significant goals can be accomplished through B2B paid campaigns: • They help you get prospects to arrive at your demo request landing page • They amplify your content marketing efforts Content marketing amplification is possible through paid campaigns. Most cybersecurity marketers think that you do not mix inbound marketing and paid campaigns. But the truth is when you combine both, you end up with a very effective and powerful campaign. Once you start a paid campaign with your content, you will notice more excellent and quick results and get the best out of your developed content. Getting prospects to request a demo is a major goal for any B2B cybersecurity marketer. Cybersecuirty paid marketing campaigns, as a successful cybersecurity product marketing strategy, help the marketer to accelerate the process. Summing up The cybersecurity landscape has recently undergone many changes. Over the next five years, global demand for cybersecurity products and solutions will reach $167.7 billion. So, it calls for a remodeling of your cybersecurity product marketing strategynow more than ever to target and attracts more prospects to your business. Frequently asked questions How to start with cybersecurity marketing? The best way to start your cybersecurity marketing is by educating your prospects about the potential cyber threats they may face in their business. In addition, you can educate them about the latest news in the industry regarding cybersecurity. Why is cybersecurity essential for marketers? Neglecting cybersecurity or taking it for granted may cause privacy risks for you and your clients. In addition, cyber threats can be detrimental for businesses. How can marketing help to improve cybersecurity products? While marketing, you may understand the quality of your product, competing with your counterparts in the market. Also, you may get feedback from potential customers. It calls for the necessity of product improvement. { "@context": "https://schema.org", "@type": "FAQPage", "mainEntity": [{ "@type": "Question", "name": "How to start with cybersecurity marketing?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "The best way to start your cybersecurity marketing is by educating your prospects about the potential cyber threats they may face in their business. In addition, you can educate them about the latest news in the industry regarding cybersecurity." } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": "Why is cybersecurity essential for marketers?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "Neglecting cybersecurity or taking it for granted may cause privacy risks for you and your clients. In addition, cyber threats can be detrimental for businesses." } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": "How can marketing help to improve cybersecurity products?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "While marketing, you may understand the quality of your product, competing with your counterparts in the market. Also, you may get feedback from potential customers. It calls for the necessity of product improvement." } }] }

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How Organizations can prepare for Cybersecurity

Article | April 22, 2020

According to a Gartner study in 2018, the global Cybersecurity market is estimated to be as big as US$170.4 billion by 2022. The rapid growth in cybersecurity market is boosted by new technological initiatives like cloud-based applications and workloads that require security beyond the traditional data centres, the internet of things devices, and data protection mandates like EU’s GDPR. Cybersecurity, at its core, is protecting information and systems from cyberthreats that come in many forms like ransomware, malware, phishing attacks and exploit kits. Technological advancements have unfortunately opened as many opportunities to cybercriminals as it has for the authorities. These negative elements are now capable of launching sophisticated cyberattacks at a reduced cost. Therefore, it becomes imperative for organizations across all industries to incorporate latest technologies to stay ahead of the cybercriminals. Table of Contents: - What is the cybersecurity scenario around the world? - Driving Management Awareness towards Cybersecurity - Preparing Cybersecurity Workforce - Cybersecurity Awareness for Other Employees - Conclusion What is the cybersecurity scenario around the world? Even as there has been a steady increase in cyberattacks, according to the 2018 Global State of Information Security Survey from PwC: 44% companies across the world do not have an overall information security strategy, 48% executives said they do not have an employee security awareness training program, and 54% said they do not have an incident response process. So, where does the problem lie? Many boards still see it as an IT problem. Matt Olsen, Co-Founder and President of Business Development and Strategy, IronNet Cybersecurity. Cybersecurity The greater responsibility of building a resilient cybersecurity of an organization lies with its leaders. There is a need to eliminate the stigma of ‘risk of doing business lies solely with the technology leaders of an organization. Oversight and proactive risk management must come under CEO focus. According to the National Association of Corporate Directors' 2016-2017 surveys of public and private company directors, very few leaders felt confident about their security against cyberattacks, perhaps due to their lack of involvement into the subject. Driving Management Awareness towards Cybersecurity • Gain buy-in by mapping security initiatives back to business objectives and explaining security in ways that speak to the business • Update management about your current activities pertaining to the security initiatives taken, recent news about breaches and resolve any doubts. • Illustrate the security maturity of your organization by using audit findings along with industry benchmarks such as BSIMM to show management how your organization fares and how you plan to improve, given their support. • Running awareness program for your management regarding spear-phishing, ransomware and other hacking campaigns that aim for executives and teach how to avoid them. The bottom line is that leaders can seize the opportunity now to take meaningful actions designed to bolster the resilience of their organizations, withstand disruptive cyber threats and build a secure digital society. The bottom line is that leaders can seize the opportunity now to take meaningful actions designed to bolster the resilience of their organizations, withstand disruptive cyber threats and build a secure digital society.. Pwc READ MORE: WEBROOT: WIDESPREAD LACK OF CYBERSECURITY BEST PRACTICES /11029 Preparing Cybersecurity Workforce Hackers are able to find 75% of the vulnerabilities within the application layer. Thus, developers have an important role to play in the cybersecurity of an organization and are responsible for the security of their systems. Training insecure codingis the best way to raise their cybersecurity awareness levels. Raising Cybersecurity Awareness in Developers: • Training developers to code from the attackers’ point of view, using specific snippets from your own apps. • Explain in-depth about vulnerabilities found by calling remedial sessions. • Find ways to make secure coding easier on developers, like integrating security testing and resources into their workflow and early in the SDLC/ • Seek feedback from developers on how your security policies fit into their workflow and find ways to improve. Cybersecurity Awareness for Other Employees According to the Online Trust Alliance’s2016 Data Protection and Breach Readiness Guide, employees cause about 30% of data breaches. Employees are the weakest link in the cybersecurity chain. But that can be changed by creating awareness and educating them on the risks surrounding equipment, passwords, social media, the latest social engineering ploys, and communications and collaboration tools.Make standard security tasks part of their everyday routine, including updating antivirus software and privacy settings, and taking steps as simple as covering cameras when they end a video conference call. Conclusion: The technological advancements are moving faster than anF-16, so the measure are by no means exhaustive. The important thing is to keep pace with numerous cybersecurity measures to not fall prey to a cyberattack. Every organizational level plays an important role in achieving a matured security infrastructure, thus making awareness and participation mandatory. Organizations should consider a natively integrated, automated security platform specifically designed to provide consistent, prevention-based protection for endpoints, data centers, networks, public and private clouds, and software-as-a-service environments READ MORE: A 4 STEP GUIDE TO STRONGER OT CYBERSECURITY

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NATO Adds Cyber Commitments, Potential Ransomware Response

Article | August 30, 2021

As President Biden prepared to meet with Russian President Putin this past week in a high-profile summit in Geneva, Switzerland, cyber-attacks originating from criminals within Russia were near the top of a list of contentious issues on the agenda. However, there were important events that received minimal media attention that strengthened the U.S. President’s position. President Biden walked into those meetings with something new and bold: the strong backing of NATO countries on a series of new cyber commitments. In a NATO Summit held in Brussels on June 14, 2021, the heads of state and government participating in the meeting of the North Atlantic Council reaffirmed their unity and commitments on a long list of mutual defense topics. And there was also a major new commitment discussed in the press release — cyber-attacks against critical infrastructure within any NATO member country were now on the table. That is, online (Internet-based) attacks could result in the same response as physical attacks (with guns and bombs.) Yes, this is a very significant global development which highlights another way that the physical world and online world are merging fast, with ramifications in both directions. HOW DID WE GET TO THIS MOMENT? The ransomware attacks that recently struck critical infrastructure companies such as Colonial Pipeline and JBS resulted in more than just long lines for gas and meat price hikes. It raised alarm bells in countries all over the globe regarding the susceptibility of the majority of countries to ransomware and other forms of malware. These ransomware incidents led to NATO’s new Comprehensive Cyber Defense Policy. The big news: Cyber-attacks against critical infrastructure might (on a case-by-case basis) now trigger the famous Article 5 clause. “The Parties agree that an armed attack against one or more of them in Europe or North America shall be considered an attack against them all and consequently they agree that, if such an armed attack occurs, each of them, in exercise of the right of individual or collective self-defense recognized by Article 51 of the Charter of the United Nations, will assist the Party or Parties so attacked by taking forthwith, individually and in concert with the other Parties, such action as it deems necessary, including the use of armed force, to restore and maintain the security of the North Atlantic area. …” Here are two sections I’d like to highlight from last week’s communiqué (take special notice of section in bold): “In addition to its military activities, Russia has also intensified its hybrid actions against NATO Allies and partners, including through proxies. This includes attempted interference in Allied elections and democratic processes; political and economic pressure and intimidation; widespread disinformation campaigns; malicious cyber activities; and turning a blind eye to cyber criminals operating from its territory, including those who target and disrupt critical infrastructure in NATO countries. It also includes illegal and destructive activities by Russian Intelligence Services on Allied territory, some of which have claimed lives of citizens and caused widespread material damage. We stand in full solidarity with the Czech Republic and other Allies that have been affected in this way. “Cyber threats to the security of the Alliance are complex, destructive, coercive and becoming ever more frequent. This has been recently illustrated by ransomware incidents and other malicious cyber activity targeting our critical infrastructure and democratic institutions, which might have systemic effects and cause significant harm. To face this evolving challenge, we have today endorsed NATO’s Comprehensive Cyber Defence Policy, which will support NATO’s three core tasks and overall deterrence and defence posture, and further enhance our resilience. Reaffirming NATO’s defensive mandate, the Alliance is determined to employ the full range of capabilities at all times to actively deter, defend against and counter the full spectrum of cyber threats, including those conducted as part of hybrid campaigns, in accordance with international law. We reaffirm that a decision as to when a cyber-attack would lead to the invocation of Article 5 would be taken by the North Atlantic Council on a case-by-case basis. Allies recognize that the impact of significant malicious cumulative cyber activities might, in certain circumstances, be considered as amounting to an armed attack. We remain committed to act in accordance with international law, including the UN Charter, international humanitarian law and international human rights law as applicable. We will promote a free, open, peaceful and secure cyberspace, and further pursue efforts to enhance stability and reduce the risk of conflict by supporting international law and voluntary norms of responsible state behavior in cyberspace.” MEDIA COVERAGE OF NATO ANNOUNCEMENTS Global media coverage leading up to this NATO Summit was rather limited, especially when compared to the U.S.-Russia Summit and many of President Biden’s other European meetings – such as the G7 Summit and the his meeting with Queen Elizabeth II. Nevertheless, Meritalk offered this article: “Cybersecurity, Ransomware Climb Policy Ladder at NATO, G-7 Meetings,” which said, “cybersecurity in general, and ransomware in specific, climbed high onto the ladder of major policy issues at both the weekend meeting of G-7 nations this weekend, and the NATO Summit that concluded on June 14. “The increasing importance of cybersecurity on the national stage tracks with U.S. policy in recent months, including federal government responses to major software supply chain cyber assaults and ransomware attacks against U.S. critical infrastructure sector companies that are believed to have originated from organizations based in Russia. President Biden has promised to confront Russian President Vladimir Putin with cybersecurity and ransomware issues when the two leaders meet on June 16. …” Also, Info security Magazine ran an excellent piece entitled: “NATO Warns it Will Consider a Military Response to Cyber-Attacks,” which said, “NATO has warned it is prepared to treat cyber-attacks in the same way as an armed attack against any of its allies and issue a military response against the perpetrators. “In a communique issued by governments attending the meeting of the North Atlantic Council in Brussels yesterday, the military alliance revealed it had endorsed a Comprehensive Cyber Defence Policy, in which a decision will be taken to invoke Article 5 “on a case-by-case basis” following a cyber-attack. Under Article 5 of the NATO treaty, first signed in 1949, when any NATO ally is the victim of an armed attack, it will be considered an attack on all alliance members, who will theoretically take any actions necessary to defend that ally….” When I posted this NATO cyber topic on LinkedIn, the responses were all over the map. You can join that discussion here. Here are a few comments worth noting: Michael Kaiser, president and CEO at Defending Digital Campaigns: “Attribution better be 110 percent.” Paul Gillingwater, management consultant, Chaucer Group: “A cyber counter-attack *is* a military response. It's now one battlefield, from sea, land, air, space to cyberspace. Next: your AI will be trying to persuade my AI that it was actually a pacifist.” Kaushik (Manian) Venkatasubramaniyan, project manager, Global Business Research (GBR): “These kind of cyber-attacks targeting hospitals etc. are acts of war anyway.” FINAL THOUGHTS ON IMPORTANCE OF NATO ANNOUNCEMENT For many years, cyber pros have been talking about a “Cyber 9/11” or “Cyber Pearl Harbor.” Many experts still believe that those major cyber incidents are inevitable. Still, “smaller” cyber-attacks are now happening all the time all over the world — with very serious consequences. Bad actors are asking for larger ransoms and causing more harm. Ransomware is evolving, and future cyber-attacks may not be ended by paying a ransom to the cyber criminals. With many cyber-attacks against governments, hospitals and now critical infrastructure like gas pipeline companies and food processing plants taking place, new government actions were a must. These ransomware attacks via different types of malware are becoming more frequent and serious, and are a growing global challenge for public- and private-sector leaders. Many questions must be answered quickly, such as: Where are the “red lines” that cannot be crossed? Once the lines are identified, what happens if they are crossed? When does a cyber-attack become an act of war? Make no mistake, NATO’s new policy on cyber-attacks against critical infrastructures is a big deal. Expect more ransomware attacks to occur and those global commitments for action to be tested in the years ahead. Article Orginal Source: https://www.govtech.com/blogs/lohrmann-on-cybersecurity/nato-adds-cyber-commitments-potential-ransomware-response

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Spotlight

NSHC

As one of the leading cybersecurity company of South Korea, NSHC is now the no.1 mobile security solution provider in Far East Asia, no.1 ICS/SCADA Offensive Security Service Provider in the whole of Asia, and striving further to be the top cybersecurity company in the world.

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