Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) Webinar Clinic

| April 26, 2016

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The webinar will be presented by University of Fairfax adjunct Professor, Dustin Loeffler, J.D., CCFI, CEH, CFA, CISM, CISSP, MCSA, PMP, and Six Sigma Black Belt. Dustin is currently an information security consultant with the US Government, assistant professor, & software developer. Previously he was the engineering program manager for Boeing St. Louis after completing stints in Washington DC and Dallas, TX. Prior to this position, Dustin served as the Information Systems Security Manager (ISSM) for Boeing St. Louis. Dustin specializes in Effective Writing in Information Security; Forensic Evaluation and Incident Management; Legal and Ethical Practices in Information Security; and Intrusion Detection, Attacks, and Countermeasures.

Spotlight

Fulcrum Biometrics, LLC

With over a decade of experience in the global biometrics industry, Fulcrum Biometrics has become a trusted and leading producer, distributor and integrator of biometric identification systems and devices for commercial, civil and military customers in over 90 countries. Fulcrum is the developer and integrator of the Fulcrum Biometric Framework (FbF) and Biodentify product lines, which include both developer and end-user solutions for identity management, logical and physical access control, winlogin with enterprise SSO, time and attendance, live scan, AFIS/ABIS and mobile ID.

OTHER ARTICLES

What Is Mac Malware, How It Penetrates Your Device, and How to Get Rid of It

Article | November 25, 2020

I would like to share my experience with you and talk about viruses created for Mac devices and how to deal with them. You may say that there are no Mac viruses as Apple does not allow it. However, I may say that there are plenty of nasty malware types like adware that open new tabs in your browser, redirect you to irrelevant pages and show numerous popups. Yes, these are not real viruses. Adware like Search Marquis cannot clone itself and infect other connected devices. It cannot encrypt your files or cause any other harm. Its activity is related only to web redirects and excessive advertising. At the same time, who knows which rogue websites adware may land you on next time. It may happen that you end up on a phishing website where cyber crooks harvest personal information that leads to identity theft. Fake antiviruses I strongly recommend removing all adware that penetrated your device. But there is a problem here. If you want to get rid of Mac adware, you cannot quickly find a solution. If you go to google and search there how to get rid of Mac malware, you will see that all top results offer you to buy and install some shady software. In reality, these Mac antiviruses do nothing, as we know that the Apple ecosystem does not allow apps to access other apps' data. No antivirus can really scan and check your files. How to remove Mac malware Solution 1: If your system is infected with adware and you do not know how to get rid of it, you may try to call Apple and ask what to do. You can find their phone number here: support.apple.com/en-gb/HT201232#us-ca. Solution 2: Another option is to try your luck on Apple communities. Thousands of tech enthusiasts help uses with their problems there. Here is a sample thread: discussions.apple.com/thread/8226644. Solution 3: There are other options too. Apple operating systems are not very difficult to use, and any person can remove adware manually by going through step-by-step guides posted on numerous malware removal websites. Here is a guide by BitAdvisors.com on how to remove Search Marquis malware. Most rogue software works by exploiting bugs and vulnerabilities in your computer's operating system. And macOS has its own bugs too. To fix these vulnerabilities, Apple periodically releases operating system updates. To date, macOS has not proved attractive enough for cybercriminals and evil developers to flood it with malware. Protection tips To stays away from any surprises, it is recommended to update your OS as well as all apps installed regularly. You should never install apps from unofficial app stores not controlled by Apple. One of the ways for adware to penetrate your Mac computer is through bundled installs. You download and install a very useful app that is often free, but in reality, you get several apps. People never read user agreements written in small print. There it can be noted that you agree to install additional tools and provide some rights to them. Whenever you install something, be careful and read user agreements, and do not miss additional unnecessary software. Do not install any software without urgent necessity. Any additional software widens the attack surface. To be able to do bad things, current Mac malware requires users to perform some actions – grant rights. So, be careful with allowing any app to access your data, change settings, etc. One more wise move is to make backups. iCloud or ordinary flash drives will help you not lose your data in case of a system glitch or malware attack. Final advice - do use VPNs. Your connection will be encrypted, and attackers will not be able to find where you are actually located or what data your traffic consists of.

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Noxious Zero-Click Attack: What Is It And How To Avoid It

Article | January 19, 2021

For years, we have been told that cyber-attacks happen due to human-errors. Almost every person has stressed about training to prevent cyber-attacks from taking place. We have always been on the alert to dodge errant clicks or online downloads that might infect devices with security threats. However, not all attacks need a user’s oversight to open the door. Although avoiding clicking on phishing emails is still significant but there is a cyber threat that does not need any human error and has been in the recent news. It is known as Zero-Click attack where some vulnerabilities can be misused by hackers to launch attacks even without interaction from the victim. Rather than depending on the hardware or software flaws to get access to the victim’s device, zero-click attacks eliminate the human error equation. There is nothing a victim can do once coming into the limelight of the hacker. Also, with the flourishing use of smartphones around the world that entails all the personal information and data, this thread has expanded enormously. How Zero-Click Attacks Occur? The core condition for successfully pulling off a zero-click is creating a specially designed piece of data which is then sent to the targeted device over a wireless network connection including mobile internet or wifi. This then hit a scarcely documented vulnerability on the software or hardware level. The vulnerability majorly affects the messaging or emailing apps. The attacks that have begun from Apple’s mail app on iPhone or iPad, have now moved ahead on Whatsapp and Samsung devices. In iOS 13, the vulnerability allowed zero-click when the mail runs in the background. It enables attackers to read, edit, delete, or leak the email inside the app. Later these attacks moved to Samsung’s android devices having version 4.4.4 or above. The successful attacks provide similar access to the hackers as an owner, entailing contacts, SMS, and call logs. In 2019, a breach on Whatsapp used the voice call functionality of the app to ring the victim’s phone. Even if the victim didn’t pick the call and later deleted it, the attacks still installed malicious data packets. These grants access to the hacker to take complete control of call logs, locations, data, camera, and even microphone of the device. Another similar attack had happened due to the frangibility in the chipset of WI-FI that is used in streaming, gaming, smart home devices, and laptops. The zero-click attack blooms on the increase of mobile devices as the number of smartphones have reached above 3 billion. How To Avoid Zero-Click Attacks? Most of the attacks of zero-click target certain victims including corporate executives, government officials, and journalists. But anyone using a smartphone is a possible target. These attacks cannot be spotted due to the lack of vulnerabilities. So the users have to keep the operating system along with the third-party software updated. Also, it is a must to give minimal permissions to apps that are being installed on the device. Moreover, if you own a business and are afraid of the zero-click attacks on your company’s app, you can always seek IT consultations from top-notch companies orhire developersthat will help in developing applications with hard-to-creep-into programming languages where detecting an attack is efficient.

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Zyxel Helps Service Providers Deliver Solutions with Cyber Security

Article | April 1, 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic brings heightened awareness to the importance of a robust and stable communications network. Zyxel Communications is helping service providers across the globe ensure that their networks provide the necessary connectivity and cyber security for their communities to function during these difficult times. As more people are forced to work and study from home, the impact on the network is quite profound. OpenVault reports a 41% increase in bandwidth consumption during normal business hours. This health crisis points to the importance of good network connectivity wherever you live. COVID-19 brings the true nature of the digital divide into real context.

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Coronavirus malware roundup: watch out for these scams

Article | March 18, 2020

With so many of us hunting out the latest Covid-19 info, it hasn’t taken long for hackers to take advantage. So first off, a basic hygiene reminder: Don’t download anything or click on any links from unfamiliar sources. This includes coronavirus-related maps, guides and apps. Here’s a closer look at some of the specific threats that have emerged over the last week or so. The DomainTools security research team has uncovered at least one example of a coronavirus-related fake app .The Android app in question was discovered on a newly created domain, (coronavirusapp[.]site). The site prompts users to download an Android App to get access to a coronavirus app tracker, statistical information and heatmap visuals. The app actually contains a previously unseen ransomware application, dubbed CovidLock. On download, the device screen is locked, and the user is hit with a demand for $100 in bitcoin to avoid content erasure.

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Spotlight

Fulcrum Biometrics, LLC

With over a decade of experience in the global biometrics industry, Fulcrum Biometrics has become a trusted and leading producer, distributor and integrator of biometric identification systems and devices for commercial, civil and military customers in over 90 countries. Fulcrum is the developer and integrator of the Fulcrum Biometric Framework (FbF) and Biodentify product lines, which include both developer and end-user solutions for identity management, logical and physical access control, winlogin with enterprise SSO, time and attendance, live scan, AFIS/ABIS and mobile ID.

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