Comply360 - Improve Operational Efficiencies and Regulatory Compliance

NONE | April 26, 2016

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Financial institutions face numerous challenges onboarding new applicants. They must balance the risk of identity fraud with the costs of external data validation, consumer friction resulting from seemingly "un-friendly" procedures and numerous, often burdensome compliance processes. This white paper presents re-engineering alternatives compliance officers should consider making to their onboarding processes to maximize internal efficiencies while balancing compliance and security risks.

Spotlight

Fourth Technologies, Inc

Fourth Technologies, Inc. (Fortek) is a premier IT Solutions and Services company located in Cherry Hill, New Jersey. We are a minority-owned small disadvantaged business (SDB) and 8(a), graduate. Fortek is a leading provider of information technology services and skilled professionals with the experience and expertise to help you dominate your markets through technology innovation and business transformation.

OTHER ARTICLES

EMAIL SECURITY CONCEPTS THAT NEED TO BE IN YOUR EMAIL INFOSEC POLICY

Article | June 16, 2021

Compliance requirements have become more complex because of the continual evolution of security threats and vulnerabilities. Many organizations fail to create an extensive security program to cover their challenges. Emails are one of the most susceptible channels for cyber-criminals to operate. This is why every organization must pay keen attention to email security policies in cybersecurity. Because emails are prone to cyberattacks, enterprises and individuals must take critical measures to secure their email accounts against unauthorized access. Malicious actors use phishing to trick recipients into sharing sensitive information, either by impersonating trusted contacts or legitimate business owners. Email is still one of the most vulnerable avenues for hackers and cyber crooks. Here are the critical email security concepts that need inclusion into your information security policy.

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As Ransomware Surge Continues, Where Next for Government?

Article | August 30, 2021

Global leaders want to carve out specific areas of critical infrastructure to be protected under international agreements from cyber-attacks. But where does that leave others? There are ‘four or five steps you could take that could significantly mitigate this risk,’ Falk said. These are patching, multifactor authentication and all the stuff in the Australian Signals Directorate's Essential Eight baseline mitigation strategies. …” Back in April of this year, a BBC News headline read, "The ransomware surge ruining lives." And that was before the cyber-attacks on critical infrastructure sectors like Colonial Pipeline, meat-processing giant JBS, the Irish Health Service and so many others. And when President Biden met with Russian President Putin last month in Geneva, he declared that certain critical infrastructure should be “off-limits” to cyber-attacks. “We agreed to task experts in both our countries to work on specific understandings about what is off-limits,” Biden said. “We’ll find out whether we have a cybersecurity arrangement that begins to bring some order.” As an initial positive step forward, this cyber defense policy makes sense. In fact, most global experts applaud these moves and efforts to better protect and clarify international crimes in cyberspace. Previous administrations going back to George W. Bush have taken aggressive steps to ensure critical infrastructure is protected in the U.S. and around the world through actions involving people, process and technology, both offline and online. The 16 critical infrastructure sectors identified by DHS/CISA can be found here. Still, many questions remain regarding this new policy: Will all global governments actually agree on the wording? More importantly, even if they do agree, how will the agreements be enforced? Also, what happens if some countries continue to allow criminals to attack these critical infrastructure sectors from their soil? And my main question goes further: Even if all of these agreements and actions are 100 percent agreed upon and enforced, which most people don’t believe will happen, does this imply that every organization not covered under these 16 critical infrastructure sectors can be openly attacked without a response? Is this giving into cyber criminals for everyone else? For example, would K-12 schools or small businesses be “fair game” and not off limits? Could this actually increase attacks for any organization not considered on the CISA list? No doubt, some will say that schools are a part of government, and yet there are private schools. In addition, if we do cover all others somehow, perhaps as a supplier of these 16 sectors, doesn’t that make the “off-limits” list essentially meaningless? Essentially, where is the line? Who is included, and what happens when some nation or criminal group crosses the line? These questions became more than an intellectual thought exercise recently when the Kaseya ransomware attack impacted more than 1,500 businesses, without, in their words, impacting critical infrastructure. CBS News reports, “Still, Kaseya says the cyber-attack it experienced over the July 4th weekend was never a threat and had no impact on critical infrastructure. The Russian-linked gang behind the ransomware had demanded $70 million to end the attack, but CNBC reported that the hackers reduced their demands to $50 million in private conversations. "The Miami-based company said Tuesday that it was alerted on July 2 to a potential attack by internal and external sources. It immediately shut down access to the software in question. The incident impacted about 50 Kaseya customers.” OTHER RECENT RANSOMWARE NEWS Meanwhile, in a bit of a surprise, ransomware group REvil disappeared from the Internet this past week, when its website became inaccessible. As Engadget reported, “According to CNBC, Reuters and The Washington Post, the websites operated by the group REvil went down in the early hours of Tuesday. Dmitri Alperovitch, former chief technology officer of the cyber firm CrowdStrike, told The Post that the group's blog in the dark web is still reachable. However, its critical sites victims use to negotiate with the group and to receive decryption tools if they pay up are no longer available. Visitors to those websites now see a message that says ‘A server with the specified host name could not be found.’" CNBC reported: “There are 3 main possibilities for the criminal gang’s disappearance — each of which carries good and bad news for U.S. efforts to combat the ransomware scourge emanating from Russia. The Kremlin bent under U.S. pressure and forced REvil to close up shop. U.S. officials tired of waiting for Kremlin cooperation and launched a cyber operation that took REvil offline. REvil’s operators were feeling the heat and decided to lay low for a while. "This situation may send a message to some of the players that they need to find a less-aggressive business model, which could mean avoiding critical infrastructure, or it could mean avoiding U.S. targets.” Also, the Biden administration announced several other measures to combat ransomware: “The Biden administration will offer rewards up to $10 million for information leading to the identification of foreign state-sanctioned malicious cyber activity against critical U.S. infrastructure — including ransomware attacks — and the White House has launched a task force to coordinate efforts to stem the ransomware scourge. "It is also launching the website stopransomware.gov to offer the public resources for countering the threat and building more resilience into networks, a senior administration official told reporters.” And yet, many experts are still predicting that ransomware will continue to grow in the near future. For example, TechHQ wrote that “identifying the culprits often isn't as big an obstacle as apprehending them.” To show recent growth of ransomware attacks, Fox Business offered details on a Check Point report this past week that “ransomware attacks surge, growing 93 percent each week.” Also: “'The ransomware business is booming. We’re seeing global surges in ransomware across every major geography, especially in the last two months,' said Lotem Finkelstein, head of threat intelligence at Check Point Software. 'We believe the trend is driven by scores of new entrants into the ransomware business.'" For more background on this hot topic, a few weeks back I appeared on MiTech News to discuss the ransomware crisis. FINAL THOUGHTS I’d like to close with this article which offers a slightly different perspective on ransomware from ZDNet Australia: “The threat of ransomware dominates the cyber news right now, and rightly so. But this week Rachael Falk, chief executive officer of Australia's Cyber Security Cooperative Research Centre, made a very good point. Ransomware is ‘Totally foreseeable and preventable because it's a known problem," Falk told a panel discussion at the Australian Strategy Policy Institute (ASPI) on Tuesday. ‘"It's known that ransomware is out there. And it's known that, invariably, the cyber criminals get into organisations through stealing credentials that they get on the dark web [or a user] clicking on a link and a vulnerability," she said. ‘We're not talking about some sort of nation-state really funky sort of zero day that's happening. This is going on the world over, so it's entirely foreseeable.’" Article Orginal Source: https://www.govtech.com/blogs/lohrmann-on-cybersecurity/as-ransomware-surge-continues-where-next-for-government

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Is the CEH v11 Course Worthwhile to Pursue After Windows 11 Update?

Article | September 13, 2021

If you are finding it confusing to decide whether to pursue the CEH v11 course now after the Windows 11 update, then you have certainly landed on the right page. We are here to make things clear to you so that you can make your decision without any hassle. When it comes to Certified Ethical Hacking, it is considered to be one of the most popular testing certifications at present in the industry. It is highly popular because it assists many with complete know-how of the skills that are required for the purpose of white hat hacking. The certified professionals are able to anticipate any kind of cybercrime from before and respond to it proficiently to avert any kind of business damage. In the time of the pandemic, many business organizations have to move to digital platforms to reach their customers without lockdown troubles. This is the reason why investment in the domain of cybersecurity has also gained a wave. Businesses have realized what the value of having their infrastructure cyber resilient is. This shows why the opportunities for skilled experts in the cybersecurity domain are never going to end in the coming future, and pursuing the course of CEH v11 is a great move to follow. To make things more convincing, we are here to help you with the importance the course of Certified Ethical Hacking brings into play and how you must choose the right career path in the respective field. Let’s get started. Ethical Hacking: What It Is To The World? When it comes to ethical hacking, it is acknowledged as the procedure of networks, applications, or smart devices to assess any kind of vulnerabilities if available. This type of assessment assists in reacting quickly and taking the right measures to enhance the cybersecurity of the entire infrastructure. A certified ethical hacker is basically an expert who understands the different vulnerabilities in the system and gets them fixed without any delay. This is done by following the ethical approach so that there is no such problem repeated again in the future. What do You get To Learn From CEH v11 in 2021? With the CEH v11 course, you get to learn 24 exceptional challenges in 4 different levels that include 18 attacking vectors. You get to know about various emerging attackers that include targeted ransomware, File-less malware, API threats, and more. In this course, you also get a complete understanding of different from enumerating techniques that include Telnet, NFS, SMB, IPV6, FTP, and BGP. This course also covers Malware reverse engineering, so you get a complete understanding of Dynamic and static malware assessment. Cloud computing is another prime concept that you get covered in this course, where you learn about Docker, Container Technology, Serverless computing, Kubernetes, Cloud Hacking procedures. CEH v11 also covers a proper understanding of Hacking web applications that includes web shell concepts, Web API. Webhooks, Web API security, and hacking. You also get to learn more about WPA3 Encryption and cracking. It also covers operation technology, side-channel attacks, HMI-based attacks, and more. Why is CEH An Ideal Career Option? Ethical hacking is possessing five phases of different procedures with every single process, including different actions that block any kind of vulnerabilities. With CEH v11 certification, you get a complete understanding of all these phases. These phases are basically divided in the form of network assessment, testing, and various other risk analysis procedures. As the world of technology is growing significantly, so is the risk of cyber-crime. This is the reason why businesses are looking for ethical hacking specialists who can assist them remain protected from all the potential risks. As the dependency on data science is growing across all industries, it is important that we protect the information and digital assets in the best possible way. There is no doubt that hacking is a heinous act, and almost all businesses are aware of the risks associated with it. To get protected from these risks, organizations around the world are in search of professional, ethical hackers who ensure that there is no vulnerability outside their doors. This is why the opportunities in the domain of ethical hacking have increased in the last few years, and there is no reason why you can’t say that pursuing CEH v11 is an ideal career option. Posts Up For Grabs After CEH v11 Course Anyone who is interested in developing their career in ethical hacking, including the following: Security Officer Security Analyst/Administrator Systems Security Engineer Security Manager /Specialist Auditor Security Professional Risk Analyst Vulnerability Analyst Network Administrator System Administrators Network Engineer Job Roles You Might Need To Take Responsibility As Certified Ethical Hackers Security Analyst Manual Ethical hacker Vulnerability Assessment Analyst Cyber Defense Analyst Cybersecurity auditor IT security administrator System security administrator Senior Security Consultant Security audit Network Security Engineer Cybersecurity Analyst Network Engineer SOC Security Analyst Information Security Analyst Warning Analyst InfoSec Security Administrator Benefits of Taking Up CEH v11 Certification To make it even convincing for you, below mentioned are a few of the benefits you avail with CEH v11 certification. Take a look: You are certainly able to open a lot of career opportunities with the respective course. It lets you advance in your career significantly. You get to understand what hackers might do to harm your business, and accordingly, you can take precautions. You get your knowledge related to risks and vulnerabilities improved with the assistance of the respective course. You benefit from a lucrative package in terms of salary as a Certified Ethical Hacker. Lastly, you also get to learn different types of real hacking tools as well. Wrap Up This shows why you must not hesitate and pursue the CEH v11 course even after the latest Windows 11 update. It gives you an edge over the other candidates and lets you have a successful career ahead. Good Luck!

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We Need to Improve Cybersecurity Standards in Space

Article | February 27, 2020

Last month, SpaceX became the operator of the world’s largest active satellite constellation. As of the end of January, the company had 242 satellites orbiting the planet with plans to launch 42,000 over the next decade. This is part of its ambitious project to provide internet access across the globe. The race to put satellites in space is on, with Amazon, UK-based OneWeb and other companies chomping at the bit to place thousands of satellites in orbit in the coming months. These new satellites have the potential to revolutionise many aspects of everyday life – from bringing internet access to remote corners of the globe to monitoring the environment and improving global navigation systems. Amid all the fanfare, a critical danger has flown under the radar: the lack of cybersecurity standards and regulations for commercial satellites, in the US and internationally. As a scholar who studies cyber conflict, I’m keenly aware that this, coupled with satellites’ complex supply chains and layers of stakeholders, leaves them highly vulnerable to cyberattacks.

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Spotlight

Fourth Technologies, Inc

Fourth Technologies, Inc. (Fortek) is a premier IT Solutions and Services company located in Cherry Hill, New Jersey. We are a minority-owned small disadvantaged business (SDB) and 8(a), graduate. Fortek is a leading provider of information technology services and skilled professionals with the experience and expertise to help you dominate your markets through technology innovation and business transformation.

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