Email attacks having a major impact on businesses: study

| July 28, 2019

article image
Email attacks are having a major impact on businesses around the world and impacting the personal lives of IT security professionals, with a new study finding that phishing and ransomware attacks are the most significant concern for the IT professionals. The survey commissioned by cloud security and data protection solutions vendor Barracuda Networks indicates that, overall, while most IT professionals (74%) are more confident about their email security systems than they were a year ago, email attacks continue to have a significant impact on businesses. The survey includes responses from 660 executives, individual contributors and team managers serving in IT-security roles in the APAC, Americas and EMEA regions. And the most common effects cited were loss of employee productivity, downtime and business disruption, and damage to the reputation of the IT team.

Spotlight

XTREMEFORENSICS

The roots of XtremeForensics can be traced back to 1994 when the first version of what is now ILooK was being distributed to the intelligence community of MI-5 and MI-6 in the UK. Over the next few years ILooK was only available to a subscribed user base of Law Enforcement, Intelligence Services and the Military. By 2002 ILooK was being used in 67 countries and its development was being funded by various agencies in the US that included the FBI, the US Department of Defence and the Treasury Department. During the 9/11 trials all digital forensic evidence introduced into Federal Court was processed using ILooK. This year also saw the creation of Perlustro to manage a 6-year contract with the US Internal Revenue Service.

OTHER ARTICLES

New Cyber Threat Index Shows Industries Are Under Attack in Uncertain Times

Article | April 16, 2020

It has been more than a month since businesses around the world started to implement contingencies in response to the Coronavirus. The Cyber Threat Index Report by Imperva Research Labs tracks changes in traffic and attack trends across multiple industries and countries. This month’s edition looks at how COVID-19 is affecting all industries across the globe. Our researchers have found that while some sectors are experiencing a dip in the number of attacks, on the whole they remain consistent. As the chart below shows, certain sectors have experienced a significant increase in attacks over the past few months: attacks on gaming are up seven percent, food & beverages are up six percent, and financial services are up 3 percent.

Read More

Data Privacy Problem: Are Home Genealogy Kits a Security Threat?

Article | March 2, 2020

Surprising news recently emerged from the personal genetics business. The two leading direct-to-consumer companies in North America, 23andMe and Ancestry.com, announced within a week of each other that they were laying off a significant proportion of their workforce as a result of a steep drop in sales. This past Christmas, the sales of testing kits were expected to take a sharp hike — nothing says family like a gift that says prove it. But sales plummeted instead. According to Second Measure, a company that analyzes website sales, 23andMe’s business plummeted 54 per cent and Ancestry kits sales declined 38 per cent. Industry executives, market watchers and genealogists have all speculated about the causes of the drop in consumer interest. Market saturation? Early adopters tapped out? Limited usefulness? Recession fears? Whatever the theory, everyone seems to agree on one factor: privacy concerns.

Read More

Critical Gaps Remain in Defense Department Weapons System Cybersecurity

Article | March 13, 2020

While the U.S. military is the most effective fighting force in the modern era, it struggles with the cybersecurity of its most advanced weapons systems. In times of crisis and conflict, it is critical that the United States preserve its ability to defend and surge when adversaries employ cyber capabilities to attack weapons systems and functions. Today, the very thing that makes these weapons so lethal is what makes them vulnerable to cyberattacks: an interconnected system of software and networks. Continued automation and connectivity are the backbone of the Department of Defense’s warfighting capabilities, with almost every weapons system connected in some capacity. Today, these interdependent networks are directly linked to the U.S. military’s ability to carry out missions successfully, allowing it to gain informational advantage, exercise global command and control, and conduct long-range strikes. An example of such a networked system is the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, which the Air Force chief of staff, Gen. David Goldfein, once called “a computer that happens to fly.” Underpinning this platform’s unrivaled capability is more than 8 million lines of software code.

Read More

EMAIL SECURITY CONCEPTS THAT NEED TO BE IN YOUR EMAIL INFOSEC POLICY

Article | June 16, 2021

Compliance requirements have become more complex because of the continual evolution of security threats and vulnerabilities. Many organizations fail to create an extensive security program to cover their challenges. Emails are one of the most susceptible channels for cyber-criminals to operate. This is why every organization must pay keen attention to email security policies in cybersecurity. Because emails are prone to cyberattacks, enterprises and individuals must take critical measures to secure their email accounts against unauthorized access. Malicious actors use phishing to trick recipients into sharing sensitive information, either by impersonating trusted contacts or legitimate business owners. Email is still one of the most vulnerable avenues for hackers and cyber crooks. Here are the critical email security concepts that need inclusion into your information security policy.

Read More

Spotlight

XTREMEFORENSICS

The roots of XtremeForensics can be traced back to 1994 when the first version of what is now ILooK was being distributed to the intelligence community of MI-5 and MI-6 in the UK. Over the next few years ILooK was only available to a subscribed user base of Law Enforcement, Intelligence Services and the Military. By 2002 ILooK was being used in 67 countries and its development was being funded by various agencies in the US that included the FBI, the US Department of Defence and the Treasury Department. During the 9/11 trials all digital forensic evidence introduced into Federal Court was processed using ILooK. This year also saw the creation of Perlustro to manage a 6-year contract with the US Internal Revenue Service.

Events