Findings of our survey show that cyber awareness training is badly needed for organizations

| January 15, 2019

article image
Employees are the weakest link in your security chain. Studies have found that over 90% of all cyber breaches happen because of human error. Even with the best of intentions, sometimes their actions can lead to major cybersecurity faux pas. But, how much of it is because of poor behavior or bad decisions by employees when it comes to use of their corporate-owned devices? Mimecast recently commissioned a Google Consumer Research survey with 1,000 participants to learn more about how everyday employees across numerous sectors are using their work-issued devices. Let’s look at the key numbers—and how they can help inform a strategy for combating potential workplace misuse and cybersecurity lapses. Workplace security practices by the numbers. 30%. This is about how many survey respondents are using their company-issued devices for personal reasons for at least one hour per day. Further to that point, 55% display the same browsing behavior for at least 30 minutes every day. In total, 69% of employees admitted to using these devices for their own personal use.

Spotlight

ESNC - Enterprise Security and Compliance

ESNC provides solutions for reducing the business risks of large enterprises. It provides SAP security audit and SAP penetration testing services and security products for reviewing and assessing SAP systems*. Its product ESNC Security Suite is an SAP security scanner, which allows SAP customers discover and fix its SAP security issues on a large scale. ESNC has industry specific solutions for industries such as Oil & Gas, Utilities and Mining.

OTHER ARTICLES

Coronavirus and the Cybersecurity Threat Landscape

Article | March 4, 2020

Cybersecurity professionals are always interested in understanding how evolving events shape the threat landscape. Events such as WannaCry and NotPetya may have temporarily crippled technology environments that were running with third-rate security*, but the repercussions from the coronavirus will hit every organization, no matter how resilient they thought they were. No single event to date has changed the tech threat landscape more than the consequences and impacts developing around the Coronavirus (aka SARS-CoV-2 and the disease CoViD-19). Then there are the business consequences, such as the sudden changes in consumer patterns and steep loss of income. The coronavirus is unmistakably a black swan event. It falls outside of the outliers. It creates a situation that many security professionals are familiar with: The Medusa Effect.

Read More

What is Ransomware and What You Need to Know to Stay Safe?

Article | March 5, 2020

While there may be more than 1 billion pieces of malware prowling the internet for a chance to infect victims, one particular piece of nastiness has been inflicting financial losses and security headaches for years.Known as ransomware, its sole purpose is to block access to computer systems or files until the victim pays a ransom. These ransom demands fluctuate wildly, from the equivalent of a couple of hundred dollars to several hundred thousand. In the simplest terms, ransomware is a piece of malicious software that prevents users from using their devices or accessing their personal or important files, unless a sum of money is paid. Payment is usually demanded in cryptocurrency, such as Monero or Bitcoin. Victims are told to purchase these digital assets and then transfer them to the attackers.

Read More

Here’s What Universities Need to Know About Cyber-Attacks

Article | June 1, 2021

Over the last year, the education delivery model has changed rapidly. Universities have learnt to operate entirely remotely and now that learning may resume in person, a hybrid education model will likely continue. The transition from physical to online models happened so quickly that it left many IT networks exposed to serious harm from outside forces. With a hybrid model, there is likely a widening attack surface area. A recent spate of attacks suggests that cyber-criminals are taking notice of the seemingly infinite weaknesses in learning centers defenses. But why? One of the primary reasons is that universities operate large corporate-sized networks, but without the budgets to match. Add to that, teachers and students aren’t given training to use and connect their technology in a safe way. To avoid falling victim to devastating cyber-attacks which often have dire consequences, we share three lessons universities need to quickly take on board. Your Research is Valuable to Cyber-Criminals There is a hefty price tag on some of the research conducted by universities, which makes it particularly attractive to cyber-criminals. The University of Oxford’s Division of Structural Biology was targeted in February by hackers snooping around, potentially in search of information about the vaccine the university has worked on with AstraZeneca. It’s not just gangs of cyber-criminals targeting research facilities, last year Russian state backed hackers were accused by official sources in the US, UK and Canada of trying to steal COVID-19 vaccine and treatment research. With world-leading research hidden in the networks of universities, its unsurprising that last year over half (54%) of universities surveyed said that they had reported a breach to the ICO (Information Commissioner’s Office). The research conducted by many UK universities makes them an attractive target for financially motivated cyber-criminals and state-sponsored hackers in search of valuable intellectual property. To add insult to injury, ransomware attackers are doubling their opportunity for pay off by selling off the stolen information to the highest bidder, causing a serious headache for the victims while potentially increasing the value of their pay-out. Personal Information of Students and Staff Can Easily Fall into the Wrong Hands Based on tests of UK university defenses, hackers were able to obtain ‘high-value’ data within two hours in every case. In many cases, successful cyber-attacks are followed by not only a ransom note demanding payment for the recovery of frozen or stolen data, but also the added threat of sharing any sensitive stolen information with the public.

Read More

A 4 Step Guide to Stronger OT Cybersecurity

Article | April 14, 2020

Security and risk management leaders at organizations around the world are increasingly concerned about cybersecurity threats to their operational technology (OT) networks. A key driver behind this is that cyberthreats, like disruptionware, are increasing in quantity and sophistication all the time. Industrial control system (ICS) networks are categorized as high risk because they are inherently insecure, increasingly so because of expanding integration with the corporate IT network, as well as the rise of remote access for employees and third parties. An example of an IT network within a control system is a PC that’s running HMI or SCADA applications. Because this particular PC wasn’t set up with the initial intention of connecting to IT systems, it typically isn’t managed so can’t access the latest operating system, patches, or antivirus updates. This makes that PC extremely vulnerable to malware attacks. Besides the increased cyberthreat risk, the complexity resulting from IT–OT integration also increases the likelihood of networking and operational issues.

Read More

Spotlight

ESNC - Enterprise Security and Compliance

ESNC provides solutions for reducing the business risks of large enterprises. It provides SAP security audit and SAP penetration testing services and security products for reviewing and assessing SAP systems*. Its product ESNC Security Suite is an SAP security scanner, which allows SAP customers discover and fix its SAP security issues on a large scale. ESNC has industry specific solutions for industries such as Oil & Gas, Utilities and Mining.

Events