Fortinet Threat Trends in 2015

| April 26, 2016

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FortiGuard Labs Researchers anticipate 2015 business planning as it may look from the black hat hacking/cybercriminal side of the fence. Cyberspace is the new battlefield for criminals. Why go to the effort of physically breaking into a bank vault when a mouse click can deliver the same profit? Like solving crimes outside of cyberspace, businesses need to be in-sync with ecosystem of people and technologies that are working against them in order to create effective protection. FortiGuard Labs, the threat research division of Fortinet, has taken a look ahead to determine the most significant cyber-security threats for the coming year.

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OTHER ARTICLES

What is Ransomware and What You Need to Know to Stay Safe?

Article | March 5, 2020

While there may be more than 1 billion pieces of malware prowling the internet for a chance to infect victims, one particular piece of nastiness has been inflicting financial losses and security headaches for years.Known as ransomware, its sole purpose is to block access to computer systems or files until the victim pays a ransom. These ransom demands fluctuate wildly, from the equivalent of a couple of hundred dollars to several hundred thousand. In the simplest terms, ransomware is a piece of malicious software that prevents users from using their devices or accessing their personal or important files, unless a sum of money is paid. Payment is usually demanded in cryptocurrency, such as Monero or Bitcoin. Victims are told to purchase these digital assets and then transfer them to the attackers.

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Malicious coronavirus map hides AZORult info-stealing malware

Article | March 11, 2020

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Protecting against Cybersecurity Threats when Working from Home

Article | March 11, 2020

With the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), many organizations are requiring or permitting employees to work remotely. This post is intended to remind employers and employees that in the haste to implement widespread work-from-home strategies, data security concerns cannot be forgotten.Employers and employees alike should remain vigilant of increased cybersecurity threats, some of which specifically target remote access strategies. Unfortunately, as noted in a prior blog post, cybercriminals will not be curtailing their efforts to access valuable data during the outbreak, and in fact, will likely take advantage of some of the confusion and communication issues that might arise under the circumstances to perpetrate their schemes. Employees working from home may be accessing or transmitting company trade secrets as well as personal information of individuals. Inappropriate exposure of either type of data can lead to significant adverse consequences for a company.

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Coronavirus malware roundup: watch out for these scams

Article | March 18, 2020

With so many of us hunting out the latest Covid-19 info, it hasn’t taken long for hackers to take advantage. So first off, a basic hygiene reminder: Don’t download anything or click on any links from unfamiliar sources. This includes coronavirus-related maps, guides and apps. Here’s a closer look at some of the specific threats that have emerged over the last week or so. The DomainTools security research team has uncovered at least one example of a coronavirus-related fake app .The Android app in question was discovered on a newly created domain, (coronavirusapp[.]site). The site prompts users to download an Android App to get access to a coronavirus app tracker, statistical information and heatmap visuals. The app actually contains a previously unseen ransomware application, dubbed CovidLock. On download, the device screen is locked, and the user is hit with a demand for $100 in bitcoin to avoid content erasure.

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Spotlight

DarkTower

DarkTower is a global advisory firm focused on security for some of the world’s leading organizations. Our security services, along with real-world expertise, help to proactively defend clients against the ever-changing threat landscape across their enterprise.

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