GandCrab says, we will become back very soon

| December 18, 2018

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GandCrab has been in the wild since last week of January 2018. Over the period it kept learning from its mistakes and GandCrab’s agile development grabbed the attention of many security researchers. From moving its servers to Namecoin powered Top Level Domain (.BIT TLD) servers after the first breach, then learning from silly mistakes of encryption and communication process sequence, it kept moving forward. As observed recently, after version 4.0, newer version 5.0 also has infected a large number of machines and has seen a number of variants till now. The version 5.0.9 was initially reported in the first week of December 2018, which has shown behavior similar to other GandCrab 5.0 versions. Although, to make sure that GandCrab does not become a memory before the new year starts, this version is showing message box ‘We will become back very soon! ;)’. From various indicators, we may say that authors are Russian and are non-native English speakers resulting in this poor sentence formation. We may predict the correct message as ‘We will come back very soon! ;)’.

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Spotlight

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