Get Secure: End-to-End Cybersecurity Lifecycle Frameworks

| November 15, 2017

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Business owners are becoming keenly aware that failure to have a secure infrastructure is a sure way to have a business failure. The costs associated with recovering from a security breach can be high and can pull employees off of their main functions to support the recovery effort. Additionally, legal fines for some breaches can endanger the very existence of the enterprise.

Spotlight

Q1 Labs (IBM Security)

"Founded in 2001, Q1 Labs is a global provider of high-value, cost-effective, risk management, security information and event management (SIEM), user/application/network activity monitors and log management products. Q1 Labs was acquired by IBM in October 2011. The growing company provides a flexible, easy-to-use family of offerings - the QRadar Security Intelligence Platform - that allows customers to meet their individual security management and compliance requirements, both in physical and virtual environments. Q1 Labs is a US based company with headquarters located in Waltham, MA with sales and support offices throughout North America and Europe. The company also has research & development and customer support centers in Waltham, MA, Belfast, Northern Ireland and in Fredericton, New Brunswick."

OTHER ARTICLES

How the IIoT can subdue cyber security challenges met by software adoption

Article | February 25, 2020

Matt Newton, senior portfolio marketing manager at AVEVA, discusses how IIoT can best cyber security challenges met through software adoption. According to Gartner’s 2019 Industrial IoT Platforms Magic Quadrant report, by 2023 30% of industrial enterprises will have full, on-premises deployments of IIoT platforms. IIoT platforms and software adoption is rapidly increasing – up 15% in 2019 – and this will undoubtedly continue to grow as we progress through the new decade. From enhancing operational performance to improved business processes, adopting new technology and software capabilities is vital for business success in today’s industrial sector. However, when it comes to adopting software and technology, integrating new systems with existing legacy systems in the industry can be a challenge.

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DATA SECURITY

Noxious Zero-Click Attack: What Is It And How To Avoid It

Article | February 25, 2020

For years, we have been told that cyber-attacks happen due to human-errors. Almost every person has stressed about training to prevent cyber-attacks from taking place. We have always been on the alert to dodge errant clicks or online downloads that might infect devices with security threats. However, not all attacks need a user’s oversight to open the door. Although avoiding clicking on phishing emails is still significant but there is a cyber threat that does not need any human error and has been in the recent news. It is known as Zero-Click attack where some vulnerabilities can be misused by hackers to launch attacks even without interaction from the victim. Rather than depending on the hardware or software flaws to get access to the victim’s device, zero-click attacks eliminate the human error equation. There is nothing a victim can do once coming into the limelight of the hacker. Also, with the flourishing use of smartphones around the world that entails all the personal information and data, this thread has expanded enormously. How Zero-Click Attacks Occur? The core condition for successfully pulling off a zero-click is creating a specially designed piece of data which is then sent to the targeted device over a wireless network connection including mobile internet or wifi. This then hit a scarcely documented vulnerability on the software or hardware level. The vulnerability majorly affects the messaging or emailing apps. The attacks that have begun from Apple’s mail app on iPhone or iPad, have now moved ahead on Whatsapp and Samsung devices. In iOS 13, the vulnerability allowed zero-click when the mail runs in the background. It enables attackers to read, edit, delete, or leak the email inside the app. Later these attacks moved to Samsung’s android devices having version 4.4.4 or above. The successful attacks provide similar access to the hackers as an owner, entailing contacts, SMS, and call logs. In 2019, a breach on Whatsapp used the voice call functionality of the app to ring the victim’s phone. Even if the victim didn’t pick the call and later deleted it, the attacks still installed malicious data packets. These grants access to the hacker to take complete control of call logs, locations, data, camera, and even microphone of the device. Another similar attack had happened due to the frangibility in the chipset of WI-FI that is used in streaming, gaming, smart home devices, and laptops. The zero-click attack blooms on the increase of mobile devices as the number of smartphones have reached above 3 billion. How To Avoid Zero-Click Attacks? Most of the attacks of zero-click target certain victims including corporate executives, government officials, and journalists. But anyone using a smartphone is a possible target. These attacks cannot be spotted due to the lack of vulnerabilities. So the users have to keep the operating system along with the third-party software updated. Also, it is a must to give minimal permissions to apps that are being installed on the device. Moreover, if you own a business and are afraid of the zero-click attacks on your company’s app, you can always seek IT consultations from top-notch companies orhire developersthat will help in developing applications with hard-to-creep-into programming languages where detecting an attack is efficient.

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Critical Gaps Remain in Defense Department Weapons System Cybersecurity

Article | February 25, 2020

While the U.S. military is the most effective fighting force in the modern era, it struggles with the cybersecurity of its most advanced weapons systems. In times of crisis and conflict, it is critical that the United States preserve its ability to defend and surge when adversaries employ cyber capabilities to attack weapons systems and functions. Today, the very thing that makes these weapons so lethal is what makes them vulnerable to cyberattacks: an interconnected system of software and networks. Continued automation and connectivity are the backbone of the Department of Defense’s warfighting capabilities, with almost every weapons system connected in some capacity. Today, these interdependent networks are directly linked to the U.S. military’s ability to carry out missions successfully, allowing it to gain informational advantage, exercise global command and control, and conduct long-range strikes. An example of such a networked system is the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, which the Air Force chief of staff, Gen. David Goldfein, once called “a computer that happens to fly.” Underpinning this platform’s unrivaled capability is more than 8 million lines of software code.

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Protecting against Cybersecurity Threats when Working from Home

Article | February 25, 2020

With the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), many organizations are requiring or permitting employees to work remotely. This post is intended to remind employers and employees that in the haste to implement widespread work-from-home strategies, data security concerns cannot be forgotten.Employers and employees alike should remain vigilant of increased cybersecurity threats, some of which specifically target remote access strategies. Unfortunately, as noted in a prior blog post, cybercriminals will not be curtailing their efforts to access valuable data during the outbreak, and in fact, will likely take advantage of some of the confusion and communication issues that might arise under the circumstances to perpetrate their schemes. Employees working from home may be accessing or transmitting company trade secrets as well as personal information of individuals. Inappropriate exposure of either type of data can lead to significant adverse consequences for a company.

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Spotlight

Q1 Labs (IBM Security)

"Founded in 2001, Q1 Labs is a global provider of high-value, cost-effective, risk management, security information and event management (SIEM), user/application/network activity monitors and log management products. Q1 Labs was acquired by IBM in October 2011. The growing company provides a flexible, easy-to-use family of offerings - the QRadar Security Intelligence Platform - that allows customers to meet their individual security management and compliance requirements, both in physical and virtual environments. Q1 Labs is a US based company with headquarters located in Waltham, MA with sales and support offices throughout North America and Europe. The company also has research & development and customer support centers in Waltham, MA, Belfast, Northern Ireland and in Fredericton, New Brunswick."

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