HOW CAN YOU PREVENT A RANSOMWARE ATTACK?

| August 4, 2015

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HOW CAN YOU PREVENT A RANSOMWARE ATTACK? Ransomware is the digital version of extortion. It’s as simple as that. It uses age-old tactics to carry out a modern-day crime, but the elements behind it are as old as human criminal activity itself. BACK UP YOUR FILES REGULARLY. The only way to ensure that you can immediately handle a ransomware attack is to implement a regular backup schedule so that your company can get access to the files it needs without dealing with the cybercriminals.

Spotlight

PacketSled

PacketSled automates incident response by fusing business context, AI, entity enrichment and detection with network visibility. Used for real-time analysis and response, PacketSled's platform leverages continuous stream monitoring and retrospection to provide network forensics and security analytics. Used by breach response teams worldwide, security analysts and SOC teams can integrate PacketSled's deep network context into their playbooks, SIEMS, or by itself to dramatically reduce investigation time, cost and expertise required to respond to persistent threats, malware, insider attacks, and nation state espionage efforts. The company has been named an innovator in leading publications and by security analysts, including SC Magazine, earning a perfect score in the online fraud group test. PacketSled is headquartered in San Diego, with offices in Seattle, WA.

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Spotlight

PacketSled

PacketSled automates incident response by fusing business context, AI, entity enrichment and detection with network visibility. Used for real-time analysis and response, PacketSled's platform leverages continuous stream monitoring and retrospection to provide network forensics and security analytics. Used by breach response teams worldwide, security analysts and SOC teams can integrate PacketSled's deep network context into their playbooks, SIEMS, or by itself to dramatically reduce investigation time, cost and expertise required to respond to persistent threats, malware, insider attacks, and nation state espionage efforts. The company has been named an innovator in leading publications and by security analysts, including SC Magazine, earning a perfect score in the online fraud group test. PacketSled is headquartered in San Diego, with offices in Seattle, WA.

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