Information Security Awareness: "Securing Your Computer Simply"

N/A | April 26, 2016

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The Higher Education Information Security Council (HEISC), along with EDUCAUSE and Internet2, held its annual Information Security Awareness Video & Poster Contest, an event that allows college students to win prizes, gain experience, and earn recognition by creating a PSA about information security.
HEISC works to improve information security & privacy programs across the higher education sector.
Chris Wetzel of Ohio Northern University won the Gold Prize for his entry, "Securing Your Computer Simply."

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Netwrix Corporation

Netwrix Corporation was first to introduce visibility and governance platform for on-premises, hybrid and cloud IT environments. More than 150,000 IT departments worldwide rely on Netwrix to detect insider threats on premises and in the cloud, pass compliance audits with less expense and increase productivity of IT security and operations teams. Founded in 2006, Netwrix has earned more than 90 industry awards and been named to both the Inc. 5000 and Deloitte Technology Fast 500 lists of the fastest growing companies in the U.S.

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Harnessing the power technology to protect us

Article | January 21, 2021

There is a saying, ‘you can fool all the people some of the time and some of the people all the time.’ Given the fact that there is no such thing as 100% security and human nature being trusting, this has been the backbone of many cyber security scams over the past 20 years. Cyber-criminals know that they will always fool some of the people, so have been modifying and reusing tried and tested methods to get us to open malware ridden email attachments and click malicious web links, despite years of security awareness training. If you search for historic security advice from pretty much any year since the internet became mainstream, you will find that most of it can be applied today. Use strong passwords, do not open attachments or click links from unknown sources. All really familiar advice. So, why are people still falling for modified versions of the same tricks and scams that have been running for over a decade or more? 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The list of files types that can act as a program in the Microsoft Windows operating system is quite extensive, if you don’t believe me try to memorize this list: app, arj, bas, bat, cgi, chm, cmd, com, cpl, dll, exe, hta, inf, ini, ins, iqy, jar, js, jse, lnk, mht, mhtm, mhtml, msh, msh1, msh2, msh1xml, msh2xml, msi, ocx, pcd, pif, pl, ps1, ps1xml, ps2, ps2xml, psc1, psc2, py, reg, scf, scr, sct, sh, shb, shs, url, vb, vbe, vbs, vbx, ws, wsc, wsf, and wsh. As you can see, it is beyond most people to remember, but easily blocked by technology. We can filter and authenticate email based on domain settings, reputation scores, blacklists, DMARC (Domain-based Message Authentication Reporting and Conformance) or the components of DMARC, the SPF and DKIM protocols. 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Spotlight

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