Information Security Policy

| April 26, 2016

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"Information security and management is an integral part of IT governance, which in turn is a keystone of corporate governance. Information is an asset, and like other important business assets, it has a value and consequently needs to be suitably protected. A comprehensive information security management system protects information  from a wide range of threats in order to ensure business continuity, minimise business damage and maximise return on investments and business opportunities. This is the British Library’s high level Information Security Policy, part of the Library’s
Information Risk Management Framework. The principles described in this policy provide
direction for the more detailed processes, procedures and guidelines that are referenced.
"

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Mattersight Corporation

Mattersight helps premier brands have better conversations with their customers through enterprise-grade SaaS solutions for contact centers. With the industry's largest database of customer behavioral profiles and advanced analytics, Mattersight pairs customers to the agent best-suited to handle the customer’s unique personality style. When customers and agents click, organizations gain improved conversation outcomes and measurable revenue growth. Healthcare, telco, financial, and retail enterprises rely on Mattersight to enhance conversations, boost agent performance, and gain operational efficiencies.

OTHER ARTICLES

EMAIL SECURITY CONCEPTS THAT NEED TO BE IN YOUR EMAIL INFOSEC POLICY

Article | June 16, 2021

Compliance requirements have become more complex because of the continual evolution of security threats and vulnerabilities. Many organizations fail to create an extensive security program to cover their challenges. Emails are one of the most susceptible channels for cyber-criminals to operate. This is why every organization must pay keen attention to email security policies in cybersecurity. Because emails are prone to cyberattacks, enterprises and individuals must take critical measures to secure their email accounts against unauthorized access. Malicious actors use phishing to trick recipients into sharing sensitive information, either by impersonating trusted contacts or legitimate business owners. Email is still one of the most vulnerable avenues for hackers and cyber crooks. Here are the critical email security concepts that need inclusion into your information security policy.

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Cybersecurity: Five Key Questions The CEO Must Ask

Article | December 15, 2020

Just about every single day, somewhere in the world, a company falls victim to cyber attackers, even with millions spent on cybersecurity. Every company is a target because they have data and there are too many doors, windows and entryways for cyber attackers to get in, whether on-premise or in the cloud. It is not a question of if, but when, the attackers will get in. Prevention efforts are of course important, but since attackers will get in, equal attention must be on detection going forward. And the focus must be on early detection, otherwise, it will be too late. My book, Next Level Cybersecurity, is based on intensive reviews of the world’s largest hacks and uncovers the signals of the attackers that companies are either missing or don’t know how to detect early, apart from all of the noise. So, the attackers are slipping by the cybersecurity, staying undetected and stealing data or committing other harm. In the book I explain the Cyber Attack Chain. It is a simplified model that shows the steps that cyber attackers tend to follow in just about every single hack. There are five steps: external reconnaissance; intrusion; lateral movement; command and control; and execution. At each step, there will be signals of the attackers’ behavior and activity. But the signals in the intrusion, lateral movement and command and control steps provide the greatest value because they are timely. The external reconnaissance step is very early and the signals may not materialize into an attack, while detecting signals in the execution step is too late because by this time the data theft or harm will have already occurred. My research uncovered 15 major signals in the intrusion, lateral movement and command and control steps that should be the focus of detection. My research of the world’s largest hacks reveals that if the company had detected signals of the attackers early, in the intrusion, lateral movement or command and control steps, they would have been able to stop the hack and prevent the loss or damage. My book shows how to detect the signals in time, using a seven-step early detection method. One of the key steps in this method is to map relevant signals to the Crown Jewels (crucial data, IP or other assets). It is a great use case for machine learning and AI. There is a lot of noise, so machine learning and AI can help eliminate false positives and expose the attackers’ signals early to stop the hack. There are two blind spots that just about every single company world-wide faces that cyber attackers will exploit, beginning in 2019, that companies must get on top of. One blind spot is the cloud. There is a false sense of comfort and lack of attention to detection, thinking the cloud is safer because of the cloud provider’s cybersecurity or because the cloud provider has an out-of-the-box monitoring system. However, if the company fails to identify all Crown Jewels and map all relevant cyber attacker signals for the monitoring, the attackers will get in, remain undetected and steal data or commit other harm in the cloud. The other blind spot is Internet of Things (IoT). IoT devices (e.g. smart TVs, webcams, routers, sensors, etc.), with 5G on the way, will be ubiquitous in companies world-wide. While IoT devices provide many benefits, they are a weak link in the chain due to poor built-in security and lack of monitoring. Cyber attackers will focus on IoT devices to make the intrusion, then pivot to get to the Crown Jewels. Detecting early signals of cyber attackers trying to exploit IoT devices will be critical. Companies world-wide need to make cybersecurity a priority, starting in the board room and with the CEO. It all starts at the top. My intensive reviews of the world’s largest hacks reveal in each case a common theme: inadequate or missing CEO and board cybersecurity oversight. Here are five key questions from my book that the CEO must take the lead on and together with the board ask of the management team to make sure the company will not become the next victim of cyber attackers and suffer significant financial and reputational harm: Have we identified all of our Crown Jewels and are not missing any? Do we know where all of the Crown Jewels are located? Have we identified all of the ways cyber attackers could get to the Crown Jewels? Have we mapped high probability signals of cyber attackers trying to get to the Crown Jewels with each Crown Jewel? Are we sifting through all of the noise to detect signals early and reporting to the CEO and the board in a dashboard report for timely oversight? If your answer is No to any of the questions or you are unsure, you have a gap or blind spot and are at risk, and you must follow up to get to a high confidence Yes answer. In my book, Next Level Cybersecurity, I provide other key questions to ask and a practical seven-step method to take cybersecurity to the next level to stay one step ahead of the attackers. It is written in plain language for boards, executives and management, so everyone can get on the same page and together mitigate one of the most significant and disruptive risks faced today, cybersecurity.

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COVID-19 and Amygdala Hijacking in Cyber Security Scams

Article | April 9, 2020

What races through your mind when you see “Coronavirus” or “COVID-19”? Fear, anxiety, curiosity… these internal reactions can prompt actions that we may not normally take. Recent attacks have been sending out mandatory meeting invites that ask you to log in to accounts. Others have been receiving emails to put themselves on a waiting list for a vaccine or treatment. The heightened emotions we experience when we see emails, or messages like this, may prompt us to give personal information out more willingly than we usually would. Security awareness takes a back seat as emotion takes over. It’s known as amygdala hijacking. Why does this happen to us? The amygdala is a small part of the brain that is largely responsible for generating emotional responses. An amygdala hijack is when something generates an overwhelming and immediate emotional response.Many common cyber security scams use amygdala hijacking to their benefit. We see this used often in phishing, vishing, SMShing, and impersonation attacks. Chris Hadnagy of Social-Engineer, LLC did a case study on amygdala hijacking in social engineering.

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How Is Covid-19 Creating Data Breaches?

Article | March 30, 2020

Trevor is working from home for the first time. He loves the freedom and flexibility, but doesn’t read his company’s new BYOD policy. Sadly, he misses the fact that his home PC is not protected with updated security software nor the latest operating system patches. Kelcie’s home PC is faster than the old work laptop that she’s been issued to use during the pandemic. She decides to use a USB stick to transfer large files back and forth between her PCs to speed things up. After a few days, she does all her work on her home PC, using a “safe” virtual desktop app. But unbeknownst to her, there is a keylogger on her home PC.

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Spotlight

Mattersight Corporation

Mattersight helps premier brands have better conversations with their customers through enterprise-grade SaaS solutions for contact centers. With the industry's largest database of customer behavioral profiles and advanced analytics, Mattersight pairs customers to the agent best-suited to handle the customer’s unique personality style. When customers and agents click, organizations gain improved conversation outcomes and measurable revenue growth. Healthcare, telco, financial, and retail enterprises rely on Mattersight to enhance conversations, boost agent performance, and gain operational efficiencies.

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