KEY INSIGHT: 2019 Endpoint Security Trends Report

| April 17, 2019

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New threats revealed from study of six million devices. To understand your security posture, you need to know: Are your endpoints operating as expected? Do they have the right protections in place?" Endpoint Complexity Is Driving Risk  10 security agents per device 5000+" Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVEs) on the top 20 client applications each year.

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Security Alliance Limited

Intelligence Driven Cyber Security Security Alliance is a cyber intelligence company with a global delivery capability. We are a UK based cyber security company, founded in 2007 and specialising in the provision of highest quality cyber threat intelligence and security testing programmes We bring together conventional intelligence methods and deep technical knowledge, helping our clients to understand their cyber threat landscape and make better security decisions.

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Covid-19 cyber security threat to impact businesses

Article | April 1, 2020

With millions of employees having to work from home, companies are having to look at how to keep as many business-critical functions running as possible while at the same time maintaining adequate security. “In the last week alone, we have seen phishing emails go from 25,000 a day to 125,000 – a 500 per cent increase – which means the risk is real," explains Andrew Jackson, CEO of Intercity Technology. "Whilst firewalls included within domestic broadband routers are considered sufficient for personal use and occasional homeworking, they’re not necessarily capable of withstanding prolonged periods of remote working from a large proportion of the workforce, which is why we are seeing more businesses and their employees become the targets of malicious hackers. "Just because employees are now home based doesn’t mean that security and privacy regulations such as GDPR are null and void and therefore, working closely with a trusted IT security partner is vital to help mitigate against any potential risks.

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Cybersecurity Marketing Tips for 2022

Article | September 22, 2021

Cybersecurity is growing as a market, and it has exploded since the pandemic started. This is because the companies incorporated remote work culture like never before. As a result, cyber threats and challenges are increasing. Cyber threats can jeopardize any business. Thus, the demand for cybersecurity products is increasing. However, the providers struggle to meet the increasing demand for cybersecurity services, and the competition is high. Whatever your business, effective marketing makes you stand out from the crowd. As technology has transformed, various online platforms are being used for effective marketing of all the products. As a result, most leads and sales are coming through online channels today regardless of your business. Thus, having an effective online marketing strategy defines the future of you and your business. So is in the case of cybersecurity products and marketing. Therefore, you should have a clear-cut cybersecurity digital marketing strategy to stand out from the crowd and reach your target audience at the right time with the right message. Are you a cybersecurity software service provider? Are you struggling with cybersecurity marketing? Read further to know the possible challenges of cybersecurity marketing and how to overcome them proactively. Cybersecurity Marketing- Challenges Like every other business, cybersecurity marketing, too, face many challenges. This is because the technology has developed and the competition is high. In addition, educating potential customers about the need for cybersecurity and its effectiveness is a tiresome job. Some of the significant challenges faced by cybersecurity marketers can be the following: Educating Potential Clients Most business people are not aware of the need for cybersecurity today. This is because they are ignorant of it. They will only know its importance when their business is jeopadized due to malware or an incident of phishing. Thus, intense, informative, convincing, and educational content creation is another challenging part of cybersecurity digital marketing. Building Trust, Credibility, and Trustworthiness Trust and credibility matter. Whatever cybersecurity products they use, the cybersecurity professionals know that no cybersecurity software is a hundred percentages safe. Therefore, it is a challenge to stand out from the crowd and get the trust of your potential clients as many vendors are claiming they have the best product in the world. Due to these reasons, building up trust, credibility, and trustworthiness is a hard job for cybersecurity marketers. Finding and Reaching out to your Real Target Audience ‘One-size-fits-all’ policy does not work with cybersecurity businesses. Your product can be applied to particular clients only. Thus, advertising it for the benefit of all is a foolish thing to do in cybersecurity marketing. All cybersecurity professionals know it. Therefore, finding the specific target audience for your product is a challenge. However, having a proactive cybersecurity marketing strategy and knowing the dos and don’ts will undoubtedly make you stand out from the crowd. In addition, it would enable you to build brand image and sell your products to your actual target audience, who need your products to run their business smoothly. Cybersecurity Marketing- Tips for 2022 Even if you have all the facilities and tools, cybersecurity product marketing is not that easy. Your success lies where you proactively solve the challenges you face in your marketing process. Let us look into some of the ways and tips to overcome the challenges you may face in the cybersecurity marketing process. Cybersecurity Customer Testimonials Nothing matters much more than credibility, trustworthiness, and reliability in the cybersecurity business. Customer experiences and feedback have much value in any business. Customers always want to hear from their fellow customers. Thus, testimonials are crucial in any marketing strategy. You can make use of testimonials in any form, such as written, videos, or podcasts. You can use these testimonials from your clients as a great resource to display the value of your products. So, get feedback from your clients tactically and even make case studies explaining how your product solved a specific issue faced by one of your clients. In most cases, customers may not be ready to provide their feedback for public use due to fear of a breach. In that case, you may have to find out creative ways to showcase customers' success stories and feedback without naming the names. Include Interactive Elements The modern audience needs interactive sessions and inspiring experiences everywhere. They hate the old school of marketing. Therefore, it is time to shift to virtual tradeshows and webinars. Breaking the traditional rules of marketing and digitally engaging the audience is the need of the hour. According to Matthew Fisch, a cybersecurity consultant, and SVP sales, If I want to sell into the banking or financial vertical, for example, I find events that they all go to, and I get to know them, listen to them, and then build a real relationship. “Then, when the topic of security comes up, I act as an advisor to help them build business solutions, whether it is with my company or recommending products and services that I am familiar with from being immersed in the industry. This builds trust, and you can bet when they are ready to buy, I’m on their shortlist. Apart from webinars and virtual tradeshows, you can also have polls, surveys, games, and breakout sessions as part of your cybersecurity marketing process. Again, this will capture your audience's attention, and you get an excellent opportunity to learn more about those attendees. Avoid False Information Remember, as a B2B Cybersecurity marketing professional, you are dealing with cyber professionals. Thus, focus on fact-based marketing. It is very critical that all your content should be fact-based and accurate. Why? Cyber professionals are aware that bad actors cleverly use misinformation to lure people to get personal information. Therefore, if your collaterals and brand messaging are not accurate, they may think you are one among them. It affects all your efforts and ends up in gathering a total negative brand image. Summing up Along with these, you may have to focus on many other things to be noticed by your targeted audience. However, the tips mentioned above will surely get you clients and build brand image by solving many of the cybersecurity marketing challenges faced by marketers today. Frequently Asked Questions What are the major cybersecurity marketing challenges Cybersecurity marketing faces many challenges today. Some of them can be educating the clients regarding the necessity of cybersecurity, generating relevant content, and reaching out to a specific audience. What are the effective cybersecurity marketing tactics Cybersecurity marketers can have unique marketing techniques according to their line products and the nature of the audience. However, webinars, email marketing, content marketing, and social media marketing will quickly help you reach out to your customer. { "@context": "https://schema.org", "@type": "FAQPage", "mainEntity": [{ "@type": "Question", "name": "What are the major cyber security marketing challenges", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "Cyber security marketing faces many challenges today. Some of them can be educating the clients regarding the necessity of cyber security, generating relevant content, and reaching out to a specific audience." } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": "What are the effective cyber security marketing tactics", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "Cyber security marketers can have unique marketing techniques according to their line products and the nature of the audience. However, webinars, email marketing, content marketing, and social media marketing will quickly help you reach out to your customer." } }] }

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Zyxel Helps Service Providers Deliver Solutions with Cyber Security

Article | April 1, 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic brings heightened awareness to the importance of a robust and stable communications network. Zyxel Communications is helping service providers across the globe ensure that their networks provide the necessary connectivity and cyber security for their communities to function during these difficult times. As more people are forced to work and study from home, the impact on the network is quite profound. OpenVault reports a 41% increase in bandwidth consumption during normal business hours. This health crisis points to the importance of good network connectivity wherever you live. COVID-19 brings the true nature of the digital divide into real context.

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Post-Pandemic Tech Job Market: The Good, Bad and Ugly

Article | August 30, 2021

As we emerge from the worst pandemic in a century, many public- and private-sector employees and employers are reassessing their options within technology and cybersecurity roles. Are boom times coming soon for tech companies, cybersecurity professionals and others? Marketplace.org recently posted the headline, “Are we headed for a Roaring ’20s economy?” Here’s an excerpt: “A year ago, when most of the country was under stay-at-home orders and people were losing jobs at an unprecedented rate, we asked three people who study economic history to explain whether the recession on the horizon was going to look anything like the Great Depression. “With the vaccine rollout well underway, weekly unemployment claims at their lowest level since the pandemic began and consumer confidence rising, we’ve asked them about a different historical comparison: the 1920s.” Meanwhile, NBC News reported “There are now more jobs available than before the pandemic. So why aren't people signing up?” Here’s a quote from that piece: “The number of job vacancies soared to nearly 15 million by mid-March, but discouraged, hesitant and fearful job seekers means many positions are still unfilled, according to new data from online job site ZipRecruiter. “Online job postings plunged from 10 million before the start of the pandemic last year to just below 6 million last May, as lockdowns and shutdown orders forced businesses to close their doors and reduce or lay off workers.” Meanwhile, according to KPMG in the U.K., tech’s job market is growing at the fastest pace in two years. “The move towards new remote and hybrid working arrangements, new spending priorities for businesses around IT infrastructure, automation and the huge shift to online retail are likely to provide a long-term boost to sales and investment in the tech sector,” said KPMG’s chair Bina Mehta. One more — thecyberwire.com just reported that the skills gap is getting wider regarding cybersecurity jobs: “The cybersecurity industry is projected to triple year-over-year through 2022, yet the workforce shortage still stands at millions worldwide. With a 273 percent increase in large-scale data breaches in the first quarter of 2020 alone, employing more cybersecurity professionals is a pressing challenge for both companies looking to hire in-house and cybersecurity agencies alike. “According to the International Information System Security Certification Consortium, there are now more than 4.07 million unfilled cybersecurity positions across the world. Despite high entry salaries, recession-proof job security and plentiful career opportunities, there are simply not enough trained cybersecurity professionals to fill the skills gap.” BAD TREND — AND EVEN SOME UGLY MIXED IN I recently posted a story from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution on LinkedIn entitled “Employers are hiring again but struggling to find workers.” Here’s an excerpt: “Chris New said he has turned down $250,000 in business because he just can’t hire enough laborers and drivers at his Carrollton-based company, Barnes Van Lines. “There are plenty of people without jobs, but unemployment benefits give them too much incentive not to work, he said. ‘We advertise and nobody comes in looking for a job. A lot of people are taking advantage of the system. It’s really killing us.’” Although the focus on this article was not technology or cybersecurity jobs, many of the comments were tech- and cyber-related. Marlin Brandys: So how do they explain people like me with a B.S. in networking and cybersecurity and an NCSP both from 2020 and I can’t even get an interview for a tier 1 help desk job? All these posts and stories from corporate America, universities, government agencies selling the bogus skills gap and shortage story. This platform alone has 1,000s of cyber qualified people able and willing to work in entry level positions at entry level pay and benefits. Stop the madness already. I applied for unemployment 01/08/2021. It’s now 04/19/2021 and I haven’t seen a dime of unemployment compensation. I’ll gladly take an entry-level position in cyber. Quinn Kuzmich: Marlin Brandys - Honestly one of the unspoken truths of the security industry is age discrimination. Sad but true. Dave Howe: Quinn Kuzmich - broadly true across all of IT though. They stand around demanding someone "do something" about the "skills shortage" but exclude 90% of candidates based on an arbitrary checklist, and 75% more based on illegal age, sex or race discrimination, disguised as "culture fit" Joseph Crouse: Marlin Brandys you're overqualified. Marlin Brandys: Joseph Crouse, I wish I could believe that. For some types of positions in the teaching or instructing silo maybe, for entry level information security I do not believe so. Dave Howe: Marlin Brandys - it's difficult to tell. I have seen "entry level" roles demand a CISSP and CEH. Gregory Wilson: 300+ applications and 4 interviews... No job yet... Overqualified, not enough experience, ghosted.... REALITY — I'm over 60 and nobody will hire me... All the BS aside, there are lots of people ready to work... Pay them what they're worth! Dave Howe: I think there is a bigger picture. Welfare shouldn't be so generous as to encourage people to stay on it, but equally, it shouldn't be so stingy as to cause people to struggle to stay afloat (meet rent, put food on the table, however basic, keep the power on) — there is need for balance. Equally though, an entry -evel role where a worker is willing to put in a nominal 40 hours at a routine, boring but not dangerous or unpleasant job should pay sufficient after expenses so as to be able to afford some luxuries above and beyond what welfare provides — if you are no better off, then that job is underpriced and needs either automation to improve output so as to make paying more a better proposition, or automating entirely and the job eliminated. If the job is dangerous, distasteful or involves unsociable hours, then that should be reflected in the pay, above and beyond what a "basic" job should provide. The answer should never be "we need to cut welfare so that they will take my crappy, low paid job out of desperation, because adding automation means upfront costs and I don't want to pay any more" You can join in on that LinkedIn conversation here: SOLUTIONS, PLEASE This Forbes article offers some interesting perspectives on how both employers and employees can succeed in the coming post-COVID cybersecurity world, while offering a new model for our future workforce: “Cybersecurity is a striking example of where the supply-demand gap for personnel is particularly volatile, with companies routinely lacking both the technology and available human capital needed to integrate relevant, highly skilled workers at the same speed as their unprecedented digital transformation. When the COVID-19 pandemic forcibly distributed security teams, organizations were given a new perspective as to how remote teams can de-risk innovation. Now, many are moving to industrialize the 'new normal' of cybersecurity with greater efficiencies across their internal programs and the software development life cycle by seamlessly integrating expert security talent on-demand.” While this coming boom may not be good news for state and local governments who struggle to compete with the private sector for the most talented tech and cyber staff, there are new options opening up for public-sector employees as well. This research finds that many retirees want to come back and work 10 to 20 hours a week, especially if they can work remotely. Many groups are training workers for the post-pandemic job market. I also have spoken with CISOs and other technology leaders in both the public and private sectors who are much more open to hiring out-of-state workers, even though they would never have allowed that before the pandemic. And finally, what about those who can’t find work, despite the supposed “boom times” that are coming? Last year, I wrote this blog describing why some skilled cyber pros are still not getting jobs. Here are just a handful of the reasons I listed there: People are living or looking in the wrong places. They want a local job and do not want to move. (Note: More remote hiring is happening now with COVID-19, but it is still unclear if many of these jobs will go “back to the office” after the pandemic. This leads to hesitancy in taking a job in another part of the country.) Insistence on remote work. While this is easier during the pandemic, some people want 100 percent remote without travel, which can limit options. Also, some hiring managers are not clear if remote jobs will last after the pandemic restrictions are lifted, so they want to hire locally. Company discrimination due to older worker applicants. Yes, I agree with my colleagues that this is alive and well in 2020. Other forms of discrimination exist as well, such as race and gender. Lack of professional networking — especially true during COVID-19. They don’t have personal connections and have a hard time meeting the right people who are hiring or can help them find the right job. Attitude, character, work ethic, humility, etc. I have written several blogs just on this topic, but some people never get the job because they come across in interviews as entitled or too angry or having a bad attitude. They scare off hiring managers. For more on this topic, see “7 reasons security pros fail (and what to do about it)” and “Problem #3 for Security Professionals: Not Enough Humble Pie” and “Problem 5: Are You An Insider Threat?” Putting this all together, I love my brother Steve’s perspective on individual career opportunities and selling your ideas (and yourself) to those both inside and outside your organization: “It’s all about the right product at the right place at the right time at the right price — with the right person delivering the message to the right decision-maker.” FINAL THOUGHTS During a recent vacation to northern Arizona, I found myself working in a coffee shop surrounded by several men and women that were supporting global companies with technology projects. Conversations were all over the map regarding application enhancements and complex deliverables for some industry-leading names. I was frankly a bit shocked that all of this work was being run out of a coffee shop — with a few video conference calls to people’s homes. The “new normal” of global workforces became more of a reality to me, and I see this trend accelerating even after the pandemic. Article Orginal Source: https://www.govtech.com/blogs/lohrmann-on-cybersecurity/post-pandemic-tech-job-market-the-good-bad-and-ugly

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Security Alliance Limited

Intelligence Driven Cyber Security Security Alliance is a cyber intelligence company with a global delivery capability. We are a UK based cyber security company, founded in 2007 and specialising in the provision of highest quality cyber threat intelligence and security testing programmes We bring together conventional intelligence methods and deep technical knowledge, helping our clients to understand their cyber threat landscape and make better security decisions.

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