Lockheed Martin, Cybereason Team Up to Launch New Endpoint Cybersecurity Tech

SCOTT NICHOLAS | April 26, 2016

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Lockheed Martin teamed up with Cybereason to combine the latter’s Endpoint Detection and Response platform and Lockheed’s threat intelligence to launch the Wisdom EDR endpoint technology.Angie Heise, vice president of Lockheed’s commercial cyber business, said in a release issued Monday Cybereason’s services work to complement Lockheed’s cybersecurity programs. Wisdom EDR is designed to track anomalies and capture and detect threats using silent sensors integrated in the systems.Lockheed said the sensors communicate threat information to the Cybereason Malop Hunting Engine, which uses behavioral analytics to identify malicious activity.The company added its Computer Incidence Response Team and Cybereason will work to use Wisdom EDR to reveal the timeline, root cause, activity, communication and endpoints or users affected.

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Bouvet ASA

Bouvet ASA is a Scandinavian company that provides consultancy and development services in information technology and integrated communication to public and private sector enterprises. The company offers services in the areas of creative design, communication services, web portals, custom application development, system integration, SAP, business intelligence, application management, and education and training. It serves the commerce, energy, public, retail, banking and finance, and service industries.

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