Multibillion-Dollar Cybersecurity Markets in Asia Pac and Latin America

STEVE MORGAN | April 26, 2016

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The cybersecurity industry is a multihundred-billion-dollar global market, and there’s no end in sight. Cybercrime is a worldwide problem, and it continues to rise in practically every country. While North America remains the obvious market leader, the rest of the world is starting to catch up. Asia Pacific and Latin America are two regions for investors and startups to keep an eye on.The Cybersecurity Ventures Q4 2015 Asia-Pacific Report states that market expansion is being driven by DDoS attacks, adoption of cloud computing and mobile devices. Organizations in the Asia Pac region were forecast to spend $230 billion to deal with cybersecurity breaches in 2014 — the highest amount for any region in the world, according to International Data Corporation (IDC) and the National University of Singapore survey, as reported in Marsh’s “Cybercrime in Asia” 2014 report.A report from Research and Markets forecasts the cybersecurity market in the Asia-Pacific region to grow at a CAGR of 15.15 percent over the period of 2014 to 2019.

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Article | June 1, 2021

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