Phishing in the financial industry

| January 29, 2019

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Phishing is the most highly effective cybercrime according to most all data analysis.  While Phishing has been around for years, there are more advanced technologies and tools in the hands of Cyber Criminals, and the overall impact and costs related to Phishing are becoming an epidemic. With that said, some industries represent a more attractive target for criminals. Toward the top of that list, we find the Financial Services Industry. Banks, Insurance Companies, online payments services, and other financial services sectors have been impacted by phishing in the past few years.

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PLEX Solutions, LLC

PLEX is a boutique small business operating in both Federal and Commercial market spaces. We possess unparalleled technical acumen gained from decades of proven successes in the Department of Defense and Intelligence Community; and we pair that with superior leadership and management experience.

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