Protecting your PC against any malware using Kaspersky Lab’s Trusted Applications technology

| April 26, 2016

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Computers and the Internet are no longer a minority interest. Just ten years ago, they were mostly used by enthusiasts who had a certain level of IT proficiency. However, technologies evolved, making PCs easier to use. New uses for computers emerged which made them attractive to ordinary, non-IT savvy people, not just enthusiasts. Communicating on social networks, buying goods online, downloading books, films, games and other content opened up the IT world, even for users with minimal knowledge of computer technologies.

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Excelian

Excelian was founded in 2001 in order to meet the market demand for a company that would ‘go the extra mile’ to provide technical application and business expertise to the financial services and commodities industry. From the outset, Excelian sought to be known for its excellence: we offered the unique and valuable combination of strong business knowledge, profound understanding of package solutions, in particular Murex, Calypso and Openlink, and high-level technical expertise – all delivered professionally and ethically alongside a top-quality consultative service.

OTHER ARTICLES

Guest Blog: Cyber security guidance for remote working

Article | March 20, 2020

In these challenging times, it’s sad to learn that cyber criminals are only increasing their activity as they look to capitalise on the Covid-19 crisis. With the NCSC (National Cyber Security Centre) issuing warnings of such activity on a daily basis, it’s important that we all work to protect our businesses from the damage of cybercrime. As many of us move to working from home, the opportunity for cyber attacks only increases, so it’s vital that we work together with our IT colleagues to adopt good cyber health practices. If you are working from home, you should only be using a VPN (Virtual Private Network) or a secure home network with strong end-to-end encryption; e.g. Office 365 SSL session. Don’t be tempted to use public wifi, as hackers can position themselves between you and the access point.

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CISOS PARTICIPATE IN CYBER WARGAMES TO HONE RANSOMWARE RESPONSE PLANS WITH EC-COUNCIL

Article | March 2, 2020

EC-Council, leading global information security certification body, conducted a table-top, cyber wargame among top cybersecurity executives in Tampa, Florida. The sold-out session, “CISO wargame,” included 27 senior executives from the largest managed IT service providers in the United States. The event presented the security experts with a simulated incident where an organization is hit by a ransomware attack. Participants had to work to contain the damage of the attack, which grew more complicated as the 4-hour exercise unfolded. Participants were tasked with deciding whether to pay a ransom and use ransom negotiators as well as to communicate with employees, stockholders, and the media about the breach.

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What Does It Take to Be a Cybersecurity Professional?

Article | August 30, 2021

While eating dinner at a Fourth of July cookout last weekend, my nephew described why he had so many career options as a pilot: There’s a shortage of pilots, and many existing pilots will be retiring soon. Other current pilots need to be retrained, because they fell behind in various ways during the pandemic. New people want to get into the field, but there are many hard requirements that can’t be faked, like flying hours, or unique experience on specific aircraft. There are many job openings and everyone is hiring. My response? Sounds a lot like our current cybersecurity career field. Professionals in cyber are seeing almost the exact same things. And yes, there are many, perhaps thousands, of articles on this topic saying different things. Everyone is focused on the shortages of cyber pros and the talent issues we currently face. But how hard is it to get into a cyber career for the long term? How can someone move into a fulfilling career that will last well beyond their current role? One reason I like the pilot training comparison is that becoming an excellent cyber pro takes time and commitment. If there are any “quick wins” (with minimal preparation or training) in cybersecurity careers, they probably won’t last very long — in the same way that flying large airplanes takes years of experience. After I got home that night, I saw this article from TechRepublic proclaiming “you don’t have to be a tech expert to become a cybersecurity pro.” Here’s an excerpt: “Ning Wang: I think that we’re in a pretty bad state. No matter which source you look at, there are a lot more job openings for cybersecurity than there are qualified people to fill it. And I have worked at other security companies before Offensive Security, and I know firsthand, it is really hard to hire those people. … “You may think that you have to have so much technology background to go into security. And again, I know firsthand that is not the case. What does it take to be a great cybersecurity professional? And I think from my observation and working with people and interacting with people, they need a creative mind, a curious mind, you have to be curious about things. … “And then even if you have all of that, there’s no shortcuts. If you look at all the great people in cybersecurity, just like all the other fields, that 10,000-hour rule applies here as well.” My response? I certainly agree that advanced degrees and formal certifications are not required (although they help). Still, the 10,000-hour rule and determination are must-haves to last in the long term. Here’s what I wrote for CSO Magazine a decade ago on the topic of “Are you a security professional?”: “Many experts and organizations define a security professional based upon whether or not they have a CISSP, CISM, Master’s Degree in Information Assurance or other credentials. Or, are you in an organization or business unit with 'security' in the title? While these characteristics certainly help, my definition is much broader than that. "Why? I have seen people come and go in the security area. For example: Adam Shostack started his career as a UNIX sysadmin. Likewise, you probably know people who started in security and left, or who still have a different job title but read blogs like this one because their job includes something less than 50% information security. (That is, they wear multiple hats). Others are assigned to a security function against their will or leave a security office despite their love for the field (when a too-tempting opportunity arises). Some come back, others never will.” WHY BECOME A CYBER PRO? This CompTIA article outlines some of the top jobs in cybersecurity, with average salaries: 1. Cybersecurity Analyst $95,000 2. Cybersecurity Consultant $91,000 3. Cyber Security Manager/Administrator $105,000 4. Software Developer/Engineer $110,140* 5. Systems Engineer $90,920 6. Network Engineer/Architect $83,510* 7. Vulnerability Analyst/Penetration Tester $103,000 8. Cyber Security Specialist/Technician $92,000 9. Incident Analyst/Responder $89,000 * Salaries marked with an asterisk (*) came from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The article also walks through many of the steps regarding education, certifications and skills. Of course, there are many other great reasons to get into a cyber career beyond pay and benefits, including helping society, the fascinating changes that grow with new technology deployment, a huge need, the ability to work remotely (often), and the potential for a wide variety of relationships and global travel if desired. Becoming a CISO (or CSO) is another important role, with CISO salaries all over the map but averaging $173,740 according to Glassdoor. OTHER HELPFUL ARTICLES ON BECOMING A CYBER PRO Yes, I have written on this topic of cybersecurity careers many times over the past decade-plus. Here are a few of those articles: • “The case for taking a government cyber job: 7 recommendations to consider” • “Why Are Some Cybersecurity Professionals Not Finding Jobs?” • “Why You Should Consider a Career in Government Cyber Security” • “Play a Game - Get a Job: GCHQ’s New Tool to Recruit Cyber Talent” FINAL THOUGHTS Many people are now considering career changes as we come out of the COVID-19 pandemic. Cybersecurity is one of the hottest fields that has staying power for decades. At the same time, Bloomberg is reporting that U.S. job openings are at record levels. Also, Business Insider is offering a template to revamp your resume and get a remote job anywhere in the world. So even if the obstacles look daunting, a career in cybersecurity may be just the long-term change you are looking for. Article Orginal Source: https://www.govtech.com/blogs/lohrmann-on-cybersecurity/what-does-it-take-to-be-a-cybersecurity-professional

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EMAIL SECURITY CONCEPTS THAT NEED TO BE IN YOUR EMAIL INFOSEC POLICY

Article | June 16, 2021

Compliance requirements have become more complex because of the continual evolution of security threats and vulnerabilities. Many organizations fail to create an extensive security program to cover their challenges. Emails are one of the most susceptible channels for cyber-criminals to operate. This is why every organization must pay keen attention to email security policies in cybersecurity. Because emails are prone to cyberattacks, enterprises and individuals must take critical measures to secure their email accounts against unauthorized access. Malicious actors use phishing to trick recipients into sharing sensitive information, either by impersonating trusted contacts or legitimate business owners. Email is still one of the most vulnerable avenues for hackers and cyber crooks. Here are the critical email security concepts that need inclusion into your information security policy.

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Spotlight

Excelian

Excelian was founded in 2001 in order to meet the market demand for a company that would ‘go the extra mile’ to provide technical application and business expertise to the financial services and commodities industry. From the outset, Excelian sought to be known for its excellence: we offered the unique and valuable combination of strong business knowledge, profound understanding of package solutions, in particular Murex, Calypso and Openlink, and high-level technical expertise – all delivered professionally and ethically alongside a top-quality consultative service.

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