Scanning Databases for Credit Card Information

| April 26, 2016

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Today's enterprise consists of numerous applications and a large number of them handle credit card data. As a result of standard processing, it is often the case that credit card data gets stored within file systems and databases in clear text - which poses a huge security risk. It is vital that all occurrences of such clear card data are located and either cleaned up or secured. The PCI Standard has this concept at its core.

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Triumfant

Triumfant uses granular change detection and patented analytics to discover, analyze and remediate malicious attacks on endpoint computers without prior knowledge of the attack. Because Triumfant requires no prior knowledge such as signatures it is uniquely able to detect the advanced persistent threat, zero day attacks and other malware that evades traditional protections. Triumfant automatically builds contextual, situational, and surgical remediations that remove the attack and all associated collateral damage. Triumfant leverages this same technology to continuously enforce security configurations, effectively reducing the attack surface on every machine, every day.

OTHER ARTICLES

COVID-19 and Amygdala Hijacking in Cyber Security Scams

Article | April 9, 2020

What races through your mind when you see “Coronavirus” or “COVID-19”? Fear, anxiety, curiosity… these internal reactions can prompt actions that we may not normally take. Recent attacks have been sending out mandatory meeting invites that ask you to log in to accounts. Others have been receiving emails to put themselves on a waiting list for a vaccine or treatment. The heightened emotions we experience when we see emails, or messages like this, may prompt us to give personal information out more willingly than we usually would. Security awareness takes a back seat as emotion takes over. It’s known as amygdala hijacking. Why does this happen to us? The amygdala is a small part of the brain that is largely responsible for generating emotional responses. An amygdala hijack is when something generates an overwhelming and immediate emotional response.Many common cyber security scams use amygdala hijacking to their benefit. We see this used often in phishing, vishing, SMShing, and impersonation attacks. Chris Hadnagy of Social-Engineer, LLC did a case study on amygdala hijacking in social engineering.

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Noxious Zero-Click Attack: What Is It And How To Avoid It

Article | January 19, 2021

For years, we have been told that cyber-attacks happen due to human-errors. Almost every person has stressed about training to prevent cyber-attacks from taking place. We have always been on the alert to dodge errant clicks or online downloads that might infect devices with security threats. However, not all attacks need a user’s oversight to open the door. Although avoiding clicking on phishing emails is still significant but there is a cyber threat that does not need any human error and has been in the recent news. It is known as Zero-Click attack where some vulnerabilities can be misused by hackers to launch attacks even without interaction from the victim. Rather than depending on the hardware or software flaws to get access to the victim’s device, zero-click attacks eliminate the human error equation. There is nothing a victim can do once coming into the limelight of the hacker. Also, with the flourishing use of smartphones around the world that entails all the personal information and data, this thread has expanded enormously. How Zero-Click Attacks Occur? The core condition for successfully pulling off a zero-click is creating a specially designed piece of data which is then sent to the targeted device over a wireless network connection including mobile internet or wifi. This then hit a scarcely documented vulnerability on the software or hardware level. The vulnerability majorly affects the messaging or emailing apps. The attacks that have begun from Apple’s mail app on iPhone or iPad, have now moved ahead on Whatsapp and Samsung devices. In iOS 13, the vulnerability allowed zero-click when the mail runs in the background. It enables attackers to read, edit, delete, or leak the email inside the app. Later these attacks moved to Samsung’s android devices having version 4.4.4 or above. The successful attacks provide similar access to the hackers as an owner, entailing contacts, SMS, and call logs. In 2019, a breach on Whatsapp used the voice call functionality of the app to ring the victim’s phone. Even if the victim didn’t pick the call and later deleted it, the attacks still installed malicious data packets. These grants access to the hacker to take complete control of call logs, locations, data, camera, and even microphone of the device. Another similar attack had happened due to the frangibility in the chipset of WI-FI that is used in streaming, gaming, smart home devices, and laptops. The zero-click attack blooms on the increase of mobile devices as the number of smartphones have reached above 3 billion. How To Avoid Zero-Click Attacks? Most of the attacks of zero-click target certain victims including corporate executives, government officials, and journalists. But anyone using a smartphone is a possible target. These attacks cannot be spotted due to the lack of vulnerabilities. So the users have to keep the operating system along with the third-party software updated. Also, it is a must to give minimal permissions to apps that are being installed on the device. Moreover, if you own a business and are afraid of the zero-click attacks on your company’s app, you can always seek IT consultations from top-notch companies orhire developersthat will help in developing applications with hard-to-creep-into programming languages where detecting an attack is efficient.

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NCSC makes ransomware attack guidance more accessible

Article | February 28, 2020

The UK’s National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) has updated its guidance to organisations on how to mitigate the impact of malware and ransomware attacks, retiring its standalone ransomware guidance and amalgamating the two in a bid to improve clarity and ease confusion among business and consumer users alike. The NCSC said that having two different pieces of guidance had caused some issues as a lot of the content relating to ransomware was essentially identical, while the malware guidance was a little more up-to-date and relevant. The service said the changes reflect to some extent how members of the public understand cyber security. For example, it implies a distinction between malware and ransomware even though technically speaking, ransomware is merely a type of malware. “Not everyone who visits our website knows that. Furthermore, they might well search for the term ‘ransomware’ (rather than ‘malware’) when they’re in the grip of a live ransomware incident,” said a spokesperson.

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Single Layers Of Security Aren’t Enough To Protect Your Organization’s Data

Article | May 3, 2020

Next to your employees, your organization’s data is its most important resource. A data breach can devastate an organization’s finances and reputation for years. According to the 2019 Cost of a Data Breach Report, conducted by Ponemon Institute, the average total cost of a data breach in the U.S. is close to $4 million, and the average cost per lost data record is $150. Hackers are more sophisticated than ever and the value of data seems to rise every day. In fact, McAfee believes that 92% of organizations unknowingly have credentials for sale on the Dark Web or “dark net.”

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Spotlight

Triumfant

Triumfant uses granular change detection and patented analytics to discover, analyze and remediate malicious attacks on endpoint computers without prior knowledge of the attack. Because Triumfant requires no prior knowledge such as signatures it is uniquely able to detect the advanced persistent threat, zero day attacks and other malware that evades traditional protections. Triumfant automatically builds contextual, situational, and surgical remediations that remove the attack and all associated collateral damage. Triumfant leverages this same technology to continuously enforce security configurations, effectively reducing the attack surface on every machine, every day.

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