Social Engineering Security Awareness Video

| February 27, 2017

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This video is part of the SANS Securing The Human security awareness training.SANS Securing The Human provides security awareness training and security awareness programs for cybersecurity awareness professionals around the world. Securing The Human offers industry leading security awareness classes, tools and resources so that security awareness officers can easily and effectively manage their human cybersecurity risk. The SANS Securing The Human program includes all the training, tools, guidance and support security awareness officers need to simply and effectively build a best-in-class program.

Spotlight

Armis Security

Armis eliminates the IoT security blind spot, letting enterprises instantly see and control unmanaged or rogue devices and networks. Armis discovers all devices in your environment, analyzes their behavior to identify risks or attacks, and protects your critical business information automatically. From laptops, smartphones, smart TVs, video cameras, and printers, to HVAC systems, industrial and medical devices, digital assistants (Amazon Echo), barcode scanners, rogue access points, VoIP phones, and more – you are protected.

OTHER ARTICLES

What is Ransomware and What You Need to Know to Stay Safe?

Article | March 5, 2020

While there may be more than 1 billion pieces of malware prowling the internet for a chance to infect victims, one particular piece of nastiness has been inflicting financial losses and security headaches for years.Known as ransomware, its sole purpose is to block access to computer systems or files until the victim pays a ransom. These ransom demands fluctuate wildly, from the equivalent of a couple of hundred dollars to several hundred thousand. In the simplest terms, ransomware is a piece of malicious software that prevents users from using their devices or accessing their personal or important files, unless a sum of money is paid. Payment is usually demanded in cryptocurrency, such as Monero or Bitcoin. Victims are told to purchase these digital assets and then transfer them to the attackers.

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What Lessons Can We Takeaway from Las Vegas’ Recent Thwarted Cyberattack?

Article | February 27, 2020

Picture this: a news story detailing a cyberattack in which no data was exfiltrated, thousands (or even millions) of credit card details weren’t stolen, and no data was breached. While this isn’t the type of headline we often see, it recently became a reality in Las Vegas, Nev. On January 7, 2020, news broke that the city of Las Vegas had successfully avoided a cyberattack. While not many details were offered in the city’s public statement, local press reported that the attack did employ an email vector, likely in the form of a direct ransomware attack or phishing attack. The use of the word “devastating” in the public statement led many to believe ransomware was involved. This inference isn’t farfetched—and is likely a correct conclusion—given that cities throughout the U.S. have seen ransomware attacks on critical systems. Attacks that have cost those cities millions of dollars.

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Webroot: Widespread Lack of Cybersecurity Best Practices

Article | April 7, 2020

A new list of most and least cyber secure U.S. states shows a disturbing lack of cybersecurity best practices. According to Webroot‘s fourth annual ranking, New York, California, Texas, Alabama and Arkansas are the least cyber secure states in the country, while Nebraska, New Hampshire, Wyoming, Oregon and New Jersey are the most cyber secure. Tyler Moffitt, Webroot security analyst, tells us none of the states had an average score greater than 67%. Also, there is very little difference between the most secure and least secure states, he said. No state scored a “C” grade or higher. That underlines a lack of cybersecurity education and hygiene nationally. However, the most cyber secure state (Nebraska at 67%) did score substantially better than the least (New York at 52%). This score was calculated through a variety of action- and knowledge-based variables, including residents’ use of antivirus software, use of personal devices for work, use of default security settings, use of encrypted data backups, password sharing and reuse, social media account privacy, and understanding of key cybersecurity concepts like malware and phishing,” Moffitt said.

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Data Privacy Problem: Are Home Genealogy Kits a Security Threat?

Article | March 2, 2020

Surprising news recently emerged from the personal genetics business. The two leading direct-to-consumer companies in North America, 23andMe and Ancestry.com, announced within a week of each other that they were laying off a significant proportion of their workforce as a result of a steep drop in sales. This past Christmas, the sales of testing kits were expected to take a sharp hike — nothing says family like a gift that says prove it. But sales plummeted instead. According to Second Measure, a company that analyzes website sales, 23andMe’s business plummeted 54 per cent and Ancestry kits sales declined 38 per cent. Industry executives, market watchers and genealogists have all speculated about the causes of the drop in consumer interest. Market saturation? Early adopters tapped out? Limited usefulness? Recession fears? Whatever the theory, everyone seems to agree on one factor: privacy concerns.

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Spotlight

Armis Security

Armis eliminates the IoT security blind spot, letting enterprises instantly see and control unmanaged or rogue devices and networks. Armis discovers all devices in your environment, analyzes their behavior to identify risks or attacks, and protects your critical business information automatically. From laptops, smartphones, smart TVs, video cameras, and printers, to HVAC systems, industrial and medical devices, digital assistants (Amazon Echo), barcode scanners, rogue access points, VoIP phones, and more – you are protected.

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