Strengthening cyber security expertise in Georgia

| July 23, 2019

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Security of digital information is a major societal challenge. Georgia is keeping up with the global trend of developing cyber-security and interest in this field is noticeably increasing. GRENA, the Georgian Research and Educational Networking Association, is working with CERT.GOV.GE – the Georgian Governmental Computer Emergency Response Team – to nurture the country’s next generation of cyber specialists through a series of Eastern Partnership Connect-funded initiatives. The National Cyber-security Olympiad, CyberCube, has been running in Georgia since 2016. This annual contest aimed at the under 25s is designed to stimulate young minds and brings a level of prestige to those who take part. Designed to complement this is an online portal, Cyber-Lab.Tech. On the platform, users can find tasks to challenge themselves and keep up to date with current developments in the sector.

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SolarWinds (NYSE: SWI) provides powerful and affordable IT management software to customers worldwide from Fortune 500 enterprises to small businesses. In all of our market areas, our approach is consistent. We focus exclusively on IT Pros and strive to eliminate the complexity that they have been forced to accept from traditional enterprise software vendors. SolarWinds delivers on this commitment with unexpected simplicity through products that are easy to find, buy, use and maintain while providing the power to address any IT management problem on any scale. Our solutions are rooted in our deep connection to our user base, which interacts in our online community, thwack, to solve problems, share technology and best practices, and directly participate in our product development process.Specialties includes IT management, Application & Server Management, Network Management, Virtualization Management, Log & Security Information Management, Storage Management, IT Alert & On-call Manageme

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Noxious Zero-Click Attack: What Is It And How To Avoid It

Article | January 19, 2021

For years, we have been told that cyber-attacks happen due to human-errors. Almost every person has stressed about training to prevent cyber-attacks from taking place. We have always been on the alert to dodge errant clicks or online downloads that might infect devices with security threats. However, not all attacks need a user’s oversight to open the door. Although avoiding clicking on phishing emails is still significant but there is a cyber threat that does not need any human error and has been in the recent news. It is known as Zero-Click attack where some vulnerabilities can be misused by hackers to launch attacks even without interaction from the victim. Rather than depending on the hardware or software flaws to get access to the victim’s device, zero-click attacks eliminate the human error equation. There is nothing a victim can do once coming into the limelight of the hacker. Also, with the flourishing use of smartphones around the world that entails all the personal information and data, this thread has expanded enormously. How Zero-Click Attacks Occur? The core condition for successfully pulling off a zero-click is creating a specially designed piece of data which is then sent to the targeted device over a wireless network connection including mobile internet or wifi. This then hit a scarcely documented vulnerability on the software or hardware level. The vulnerability majorly affects the messaging or emailing apps. The attacks that have begun from Apple’s mail app on iPhone or iPad, have now moved ahead on Whatsapp and Samsung devices. In iOS 13, the vulnerability allowed zero-click when the mail runs in the background. It enables attackers to read, edit, delete, or leak the email inside the app. Later these attacks moved to Samsung’s android devices having version 4.4.4 or above. The successful attacks provide similar access to the hackers as an owner, entailing contacts, SMS, and call logs. In 2019, a breach on Whatsapp used the voice call functionality of the app to ring the victim’s phone. Even if the victim didn’t pick the call and later deleted it, the attacks still installed malicious data packets. These grants access to the hacker to take complete control of call logs, locations, data, camera, and even microphone of the device. Another similar attack had happened due to the frangibility in the chipset of WI-FI that is used in streaming, gaming, smart home devices, and laptops. The zero-click attack blooms on the increase of mobile devices as the number of smartphones have reached above 3 billion. How To Avoid Zero-Click Attacks? Most of the attacks of zero-click target certain victims including corporate executives, government officials, and journalists. But anyone using a smartphone is a possible target. These attacks cannot be spotted due to the lack of vulnerabilities. So the users have to keep the operating system along with the third-party software updated. Also, it is a must to give minimal permissions to apps that are being installed on the device. Moreover, if you own a business and are afraid of the zero-click attacks on your company’s app, you can always seek IT consultations from top-notch companies orhire developersthat will help in developing applications with hard-to-creep-into programming languages where detecting an attack is efficient.

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Guest Blog: Cyber security guidance for remote working

Article | March 20, 2020

In these challenging times, it’s sad to learn that cyber criminals are only increasing their activity as they look to capitalise on the Covid-19 crisis. With the NCSC (National Cyber Security Centre) issuing warnings of such activity on a daily basis, it’s important that we all work to protect our businesses from the damage of cybercrime. As many of us move to working from home, the opportunity for cyber attacks only increases, so it’s vital that we work together with our IT colleagues to adopt good cyber health practices. If you are working from home, you should only be using a VPN (Virtual Private Network) or a secure home network with strong end-to-end encryption; e.g. Office 365 SSL session. Don’t be tempted to use public wifi, as hackers can position themselves between you and the access point.

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Article | February 22, 2020

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Article | March 18, 2020

With so many of us hunting out the latest Covid-19 info, it hasn’t taken long for hackers to take advantage. So first off, a basic hygiene reminder: Don’t download anything or click on any links from unfamiliar sources. This includes coronavirus-related maps, guides and apps. Here’s a closer look at some of the specific threats that have emerged over the last week or so. The DomainTools security research team has uncovered at least one example of a coronavirus-related fake app .The Android app in question was discovered on a newly created domain, (coronavirusapp[.]site). The site prompts users to download an Android App to get access to a coronavirus app tracker, statistical information and heatmap visuals. The app actually contains a previously unseen ransomware application, dubbed CovidLock. On download, the device screen is locked, and the user is hit with a demand for $100 in bitcoin to avoid content erasure.

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Spotlight

SolarWinds

SolarWinds (NYSE: SWI) provides powerful and affordable IT management software to customers worldwide from Fortune 500 enterprises to small businesses. In all of our market areas, our approach is consistent. We focus exclusively on IT Pros and strive to eliminate the complexity that they have been forced to accept from traditional enterprise software vendors. SolarWinds delivers on this commitment with unexpected simplicity through products that are easy to find, buy, use and maintain while providing the power to address any IT management problem on any scale. Our solutions are rooted in our deep connection to our user base, which interacts in our online community, thwack, to solve problems, share technology and best practices, and directly participate in our product development process.Specialties includes IT management, Application & Server Management, Network Management, Virtualization Management, Log & Security Information Management, Storage Management, IT Alert & On-call Manageme

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