Think like a Bad Guy: Understanding Advanced Threats and How to Mitigate Them

| April 26, 2016

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When you're a hacker, time is on your side. Time to find a soft spot in your armor, to evade defenses, to seek out your most critical data. Increasingly, today's advanced threats circumvent traditional defenses - even sand boxing. You need a new approach. This Slash Guide white paper helps you understand advanced threats and how to defend against them.

Spotlight

EVRY

EVRY has about 10.000 employees and has a local presence in 50 towns and cities across the Nordic countries, with particular emphasis on Norway and Sweden. In addition, EVRY owns businesses in India and the Ukraine that contribute significant deliveries to Nordic customers in addition to providing services to customers in other European countries and in the USA.

OTHER ARTICLES

5 Benefits of Investing in Cyber Security & IT solutions in 2021

Article | June 2, 2021

Cyber Security has quickly evolved from being just an IT problem to a business problem. Recent attacks like those on Travelex and the SolarWinds hack have proved that cyber-attacks can affect the most solid of businesses and create PR nightmares for brands built painstakingly over the years. Investing in cyber security training, cyber security advisory services and the right kind of IT support products, has therefore, become imperative in 2021. Investing in cyber security infrastructure, cyber security certification for employees and IT solutions safeguards businesses from a whole spectrum of security risks, ransomware, spyware, and adware. Ransomware refers to malicious software that bars users from accessing their computer system, whereas adware is a computer virus that is one of the most common methods of infecting a computer system with a virus. Spyware spies on you and your business activities while extracting useful information. Add social engineering, security breaches and compromises to your network security into the mix, and you have a lethal cocktail.

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Wormable, Unpatched Microsoft Bug Threatens Corporate LANs

Article | March 11, 2020

Microsoft is warning on a wormable, unpatched remote code-execution vulnerability in the Microsoft Server Message Block protocol – the same protocol that was targeted by the infamous WannaCry ransomware in 2017.The critical bug (CVE-2020-0796) affects Windows 10 and Windows Server 2019, and was not included in Microsoft’s Patch Tuesday release this week. The bug can be found in version 3.1.1 of Microsoft’s SMB file-sharing system. SMB allows multiple clients to access shared folders and can provide a rich playground for malware when it comes to lateral movement and client-to-client infection. This was played out in version 1 of SMB back in 2017, when the WannaCry ransomware used the NSA-developed EternalBlue SMB exploit to self-propagate rapidly around the world.

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MERGING AND SORTING FILES IN LINUX: EASIER THAN YOU THINK

Article | November 24, 2020

There are several reasons to choose Linux over other operating systems such as Windows and macOS. Linux is an open-source, secure, and very lightweight operating system consuming minimal system resources. It also has huge community support and has a ton of distros (variants) to choose from. While we have already posted a bunch of articles on simple file handling methods in Linux, sending email from the terminal, and more, we are going to walk you through the simple yet efficient process of merging and sorting files in Linux. Just like with any other operation in Linux, there are several ways you can sort and merge the files in Linux. Choosing which method to use solely depends on the user and based on what needs to be accomplished. In this article, we will show you some easy yet powerful file sorting and merging methods in Linux while pointing out the differences and importance of each method. Cat Cat is one of the easiest and simple commands in Linux that can combine multiple files into one. All you have to do is list all the files that you wish to merge into a single file along with the new file name you wish to create. If a file with the name of the final output already exists, then it will be overwritten by the one being created. Here is a very simple implementation of cat command. $ cat file1 file2 file3 file4 > Newfile However, if you wish to append information from multiple files into an already existing file, you can use ">>" instead of ">." Below is an example $ cat file1 file2 file3 file4 >> Newfile The cat command can also be used in many ways. It is also one of the most flexible and simple ways of reading the content of the file. To view the content of a file called file1, simply use the below command. $cat file1 Join Join is another command to merge the data of multiple files. While it is as easy and simple as the cat command is, it has a catch. Unlike cat, join cannot just simple combine the data of multiple files. Instead, the command allows users to merge the content of multiple files based on a common field. For instance, consider that two files need to be combined. One file contains names, whereas the other file contains IDs, and the join command can be used to combine both these files in a way that the names and their corresponding IDs appear in the same line. However, users need to make sure that the data in both these files have the common key field with which they will be joined. There are several reasons to choose Linux over other operating systems such as Windows and macOS. Linux is an open-source, secure, and very lightweight operating system consuming minimal system resources. It also has huge community support and has a ton of distros (variants) to choose from. While we have already posted a bunch of articles on simple file handling methods in Linux, sending email from the terminal, and more, we are going to walk you through the simple yet efficient process of merging and sorting files in Linux. Just like with any other operation in Linux, there are several ways you can sort and merge the files in Linux. Choosing which method to use solely depends on the user and based on what needs to be accomplished. In this article, we will show you some easy yet powerful file sorting and merging methods in Linux while pointing out the differences and importance of each method. azure linux Shutterstock Cat Cat is one of the easiest and simple commands in Linux that can combine multiple files into one. All you have to do is list all the files that you wish to merge into a single file along with the new file name you wish to create. If a file with the name of the final output already exists, then it will be overwritten by the one being created. Here is a very simple implementation of cat command. $ cat file1 file2 file3 file4 > Newfile However, if you wish to append information from multiple files into an already existing file, you can use ">>" instead of ">." Below is an example $ cat file1 file2 file3 file4 >> Newfile The cat command can also be used in many ways. It is also one of the most flexible and simple ways of reading the content of the file. To view the content of a file called file1, simply use the below command. $cat file1 Join Join is another command to merge the data of multiple files. While it is as easy and simple as the cat command is, it has a catch. Unlike cat, join cannot just simple combine the data of multiple files. Instead, the command allows users to merge the content of multiple files based on a common field. For instance, consider that two files need to be combined. One file contains names, whereas the other file contains IDs, and the join command can be used to combine both these files in a way that the names and their corresponding IDs appear in the same line. However, users need to make sure that the data in both these files have the common key field with which they will be joined. Syntax $join [OPTION] FILE1 FILE2 Example: Assume file1.txt contains ... 1 Aarav 2 Aashi 3 Sukesh And, file2.txt contains ... 1 101 2 102 3 103 The command ... $ join file1.txt file2.txt will result in: 1 Aarav 101 2 Aashi 102 3 Sukesh 103 Note that by default, the join command takes the first column as the key to join multiple files. Also, if you wish to store the final data of the two files joined into another file, you can use this command: $ cat file1.txt file2.txt > result.txt Paste The paste command is used to join multiple files horizontally by performing parallel merging. The command outputs the lines from each file specified, separated by a tab as a delimiter by default to the standard output. Assume there is a file called numbers.txt containing numbers from 1 to 4. And there are another two files called countries.txt and capital.txt containing four countries and their corresponding capitals, respectively. The command below will join the information of these three files and will be separated by a tab space as a delimiter. $ paste numbers.txt countries.txt capital.txt However, you can also specify any delimiter by adding a delimiter option to the above command. For example, if we need the delimited to be "-" you can use this command: $ paste -d “-” numbers.txt countries.txt capital.txt Sort The sort command in Linux, as the name suggests, is used to sort a file as well as arrange the records in a particular order. Sort can also be paired with multiple other Linux commands such as cat by simply joining the two commands using a pipe "|" symbol. For instance, if you wish to merge multiple files, sort them alphabetically and store them in another file, you can use this command: $ cat file1.txt file2.txt file3.txt | sort > finalfile.txt There are several reasons to choose Linux over other operating systems such as Windows and macOS. Linux is an open-source, secure, and very lightweight operating system consuming minimal system resources. It also has huge community support and has a ton of distros (variants) to choose from. While we have already posted a bunch of articles on simple file handling methods in Linux, sending email from the terminal, and more, we are going to walk you through the simple yet efficient process of merging and sorting files in Linux. Just like with any other operation in Linux, there are several ways you can sort and merge the files in Linux. Choosing which method to use solely depends on the user and based on what needs to be accomplished. In this article, we will show you some easy yet powerful file sorting and merging methods in Linux while pointing out the differences and importance of each method. azure linux Shutterstock Cat Cat is one of the easiest and simple commands in Linux that can combine multiple files into one. All you have to do is list all the files that you wish to merge into a single file along with the new file name you wish to create. If a file with the name of the final output already exists, then it will be overwritten by the one being created. Here is a very simple implementation of cat command. $ cat file1 file2 file3 file4 > Newfile However, if you wish to append information from multiple files into an already existing file, you can use ">>" instead of ">." Below is an example $ cat file1 file2 file3 file4 >> Newfile The cat command can also be used in many ways. It is also one of the most flexible and simple ways of reading the content of the file. To view the content of a file called file1, simply use the below command. $cat file1 Join Join is another command to merge the data of multiple files. While it is as easy and simple as the cat command is, it has a catch. Unlike cat, join cannot just simple combine the data of multiple files. Instead, the command allows users to merge the content of multiple files based on a common field. For instance, consider that two files need to be combined. One file contains names, whereas the other file contains IDs, and the join command can be used to combine both these files in a way that the names and their corresponding IDs appear in the same line. However, users need to make sure that the data in both these files have the common key field with which they will be joined. Syntax $join [OPTION] FILE1 FILE2 Example: Assume file1.txt contains ... 1 Aarav 2 Aashi 3 Sukesh And, file2.txt contains ... 1 101 2 102 3 103 The command ... $ join file1.txt file2.txt will result in: 1 Aarav 101 2 Aashi 102 3 Sukesh 103 Note that by default, the join command takes the first column as the key to join multiple files. Also, if you wish to store the final data of the two files joined into another file, you can use this command: $ cat file1.txt file2.txt > result.txt Paste The paste command is used to join multiple files horizontally by performing parallel merging. The command outputs the lines from each file specified, separated by a tab as a delimiter by default to the standard output. Assume there is a file called numbers.txt containing numbers from 1 to 4. And there are another two files called countries.txt and capital.txt containing four countries and their corresponding capitals, respectively. The command below will join the information of these three files and will be separated by a tab space as a delimiter. $ paste numbers.txt countries.txt capital.txt However, you can also specify any delimiter by adding a delimiter option to the above command. For example, if we need the delimited to be "-" you can use this command: $ paste -d “-” numbers.txt countries.txt capital.txt There are several other options available for the paste command, and more information can be found here. Sort The sort command in Linux, as the name suggests, is used to sort a file as well as arrange the records in a particular order. Sort can also be paired with multiple other Linux commands such as cat by simply joining the two commands using a pipe "|" symbol. For instance, if you wish to merge multiple files, sort them alphabetically and store them in another file, you can use this command: $ cat file1.txt file2.txt file3.txt | sort > finalfile.txt The above command is going to merge the files, sort the overall content, and then store it in the finalfile.txt You can also use the sort command to simply sort a single file containing information: $ sort file.txt The command above does not change or modify the data in file.txt and is, therefore, just for displaying the sorted data on the console. There are several other ways of merging and sorting files and data in the Linux operating system. What makes Linux unique is its ability to pair up multiple commands to achieve its purpose. Once users start to make themselves acquainted with these commands, it can save a lot of time and effort while performing tasks with more precision and efficiency.

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Coronavirus and the Cybersecurity Threat Landscape

Article | March 4, 2020

Cybersecurity professionals are always interested in understanding how evolving events shape the threat landscape. Events such as WannaCry and NotPetya may have temporarily crippled technology environments that were running with third-rate security*, but the repercussions from the coronavirus will hit every organization, no matter how resilient they thought they were. No single event to date has changed the tech threat landscape more than the consequences and impacts developing around the Coronavirus (aka SARS-CoV-2 and the disease CoViD-19). Then there are the business consequences, such as the sudden changes in consumer patterns and steep loss of income. The coronavirus is unmistakably a black swan event. It falls outside of the outliers. It creates a situation that many security professionals are familiar with: The Medusa Effect.

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Spotlight

EVRY

EVRY has about 10.000 employees and has a local presence in 50 towns and cities across the Nordic countries, with particular emphasis on Norway and Sweden. In addition, EVRY owns businesses in India and the Ukraine that contribute significant deliveries to Nordic customers in addition to providing services to customers in other European countries and in the USA.

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