Three of the Latest Email Security Threats Facing Your Organization

| August 22, 2018

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Email is a top vector for cybercriminals to breach your organization. In fact, email-borne attacks are responsible for more than 93% of breaches, according to Verizon's Data Breach Investigation Report. Before you can properly defend against such threats you need to understand their nature. Here are three of the latest email threats facing your organization and what you can do to fight them. 1. Malware. Most people tend to associate email threats with traditional phishing, which leverages links to fake web pages to steal users’ credentials. But lately, advanced malware attacks have stolen the spotlight, and their capabilities are expanding. New forms of malware go beyond the banking trojans which are designed to steal money when a user accesses a corporate or personal bank account.

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Plum Laboratories LLC

Plum Laboratories is a research and product development firm focused on extending secure, high speed broadband communications to areas that are not well served by traditional cellular transmission connectivity devices; OR, where there exists a need for failover when an organization loses power and/or their normal WAN connectivity.

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SASE: A NEXT-GENERATION CLOUD-SECURITY FRAMEWORK

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5G and IoT security: Why cybersecurity experts are sounding an alarm

Article | March 2, 2020

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Critical Gaps Remain in Defense Department Weapons System Cybersecurity

Article | March 13, 2020

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What Lessons Can We Takeaway from Las Vegas’ Recent Thwarted Cyberattack?

Article | February 27, 2020

Picture this: a news story detailing a cyberattack in which no data was exfiltrated, thousands (or even millions) of credit card details weren’t stolen, and no data was breached. While this isn’t the type of headline we often see, it recently became a reality in Las Vegas, Nev. On January 7, 2020, news broke that the city of Las Vegas had successfully avoided a cyberattack. While not many details were offered in the city’s public statement, local press reported that the attack did employ an email vector, likely in the form of a direct ransomware attack or phishing attack. The use of the word “devastating” in the public statement led many to believe ransomware was involved. This inference isn’t farfetched—and is likely a correct conclusion—given that cities throughout the U.S. have seen ransomware attacks on critical systems. Attacks that have cost those cities millions of dollars.

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Plum Laboratories LLC

Plum Laboratories is a research and product development firm focused on extending secure, high speed broadband communications to areas that are not well served by traditional cellular transmission connectivity devices; OR, where there exists a need for failover when an organization loses power and/or their normal WAN connectivity.

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