Top 5 Endpoint Security Solutions for Business

Bineesh Mathew | April 11, 2022 | 4 views

Top 5 Endpoint Security

“As more of our IT resources shift to the cloud, and more workers become mobile, the importance of endpoint security increases”

-Elliot Breukelman, Senior Information Security Engineer, Land O’Lakes, Inc

Endpoint security is a must to secure your business against cyber threats, but it is challenging for companies to implement and maintain it. According to Small Business Administration research around 88% of small business owners think they face cyberattacks.

Two significant factors contribute to this challenge:
  • The amplified use of mobile phones and tablets for office work
  • The rapid growth in the number of remote workers

These factors make it difficult for businesses, especially SMBs, to manage IT security.

So, the question is how the businesses will address the issue? The answer to this question is endpoint security software. This endpoint software protects all your servers, computers, and mobile devices, which are collectively known as endpoints, from cyberattacks.

Different features of endpoint security products help businesses meet diverse requirements. For example, some companies manage thousands of endpoints using endpoint security solutions, while others might want to use threat hunting tools.

Solo entrepreneurs and companies with their own SOC (security operations center) can utilize the best endpoint security software to safeguard their IT systems. Check out the list of the best solutions below that meet all your endpoint security requirements.


The Necessity of Endpoint Security Solutions for Businesses

All businesses need endpoint security software to protect computers and other IT assets from various cyberattacks. Cybercriminals think SMBs are easy targets; they are particularly vulnerable to cyberattacks than different types of businesses. Furthermore, as cybercriminals sophisticate themselves as technology improves, companies cannot think of running a business without endpoint security solutions.

Cybercriminals wreaking havoc on IT systems and stealing your data can be effectively stopped using the best endpoint security software. Find yourself in peace with the below listed advanced top 5 endpoint security solutions that can help you mitigate any cybersecurity risks.


Top 5 Endpoint Security Solutions for Businesses


McAfee Endpoint Protection

The McAfee endpoint protection system includes small business protection through its McAfee endpoint security platform. Also, the company offers a comprehensive range of security products for businesses of all kinds.

This platform's threat-prevention capabilities were perfect at blocking malware and zero-day attacks in test situations. McAfee endpoint security comes with essential features, including a firewall and the ability to prevent users from visiting infected websites. In addition, adaptive threat protection (ATP) is one of the standout characteristics of this platform.

With the help of ATP, McAfee endpoint security can detect all sorts of malware, even complex threats like file-less attacks. It looks at suspicious activity and decides what to do about it based on the McAfee Global Threat Intelligence network, reputation parameters, and risk criteria.

McAfee's ePolicy Orchestrator (ePO) assists IT teams in managing the security of the company.. Set security policies, examine and analyze endpoint status, take action when threats are discovered, and assess the overall health of your company's security with ePO as a central management platform.

 
Kaspersky Endpoint Security

Kaspersky Endpoint Security provides adequate and easy-to-manage malware protection for small organizations. Kaspersky Endpoint Security cloud is a preconfigured protection platform designed for enterprises with a small IT team and less than 100 employees. It allows for speedy implementation and continuously checks the security system.

Kaspersky's defenses blocked all malware and zero-day attacks in independent tests. Even on older devices, the technique works without affecting computer performance.

Reports and a dashboard provide endpoint security information through the platform. For example, you can find out where endpoint security vulnerabilities exist and what threats the platform has prevented. In addition, the monitoring dashboard has a Cloud Discovery tool that allows you to look at how your employees use external cloud services like Google Drive.


Microsoft Defender Antivirus

Before 2020, Microsoft was known to develop poor antivirus protection. The brand has worked hard to change this reputation. In 2020, the tech giant unveiled a revamped antivirus solution, Microsoft Defender Antivirus, which replaced the existing Windows Defender software. The malware prevention capabilities of the new system are impressive.

Over 13,000 malware samples were tested by AV-Test Institute, an independent testing organization. All of them were successfully blocked by Microsoft's solution. It also thwarted all zero-day threats, which exploit software flaws. This is better than the industry average of 98.9%.


Avast Business Antivirus Pro

Avast Business Antivirus Pro is a feature-rich antivirus explicitly designed for small and medium-sized businesses. It has a free trial version that is completely functional, allowing you to test the breadth and flexibility of this simple-to-use, simple-to-install tool.

SMBs and managed service providers (MSPs) who serve SMBs should consider Avast Business Antivirus Pro. SMBs can purchase the management console or the standalone version. All devices have the standalone version loaded and managed from the device.

It's a no-brainer alternative for SMBs with OS-agnostic networks, offering different versions for the modern Windows operating systems workstations, macOS, and Windows Server with Sharepoint compatibility. Avast also offers free versions and antivirus for Linux, which are not included in this evaluation.


Bitdefender GravityZone Business Security

Bitdefender GravityZone Business Security is a robust IT endpoint security solution that caters to the needs of small enterprises. More than 500 million endpoints worldwide are protected by GravityZone, which processes 11 billion queries every day and uses machine learning to assess and improve protection mechanisms.

It uses numerous layers of defense to prevent cyberattacks. This strategy integrates machine learning, heuristics, endpoint security analytics, browser-based security, event correlation, continuous monitoring of computer operations, and more to block malware and other threats from getting on the computer and causing harm.


The Future of Endpoint Security

Endpoint security is essential to run any business online. With the resurgence of ransomware, ignoring endpoint security is a prescription for catastrophe. Malware affects businesses of all sizes' reputations and bottom lines. Endpoint security platforms are used because of their endpoint detection and response (EDR) capabilities, application control, and other features.

Possible prospects on the future of endpoint security are:
  • Endpoint security switches to monitoring
  • Endpoint security merges with identity management
  • Endpoint security goes lightweight


Summing Up

When it comes to supervising workplace security, the correct endpoint security software boosts efficiency and productivity without jeopardizing safety. Endpoint security solutions also have lots of advantages that can help your company grow and thrive. Sensitive data, customer trust, and financial loss can be protected with endpoint security solutions.


Endpoint security solutions protect

Frequently Asked Questions


What do you mean by endpoint security?

Endpoint security is a method of defending endpoint devices, such as PCs, laptops, and mobile phones, from threats.


What are some of the examples of endpoints?

Any device that is physically an endpoint on a network is referred to as an endpoint. Endpoints include laptops, mobile phones, desktops, servers, tablets, and virtual environments.


What are some of the types of endpoint security solutions?

Some types of endpoint security are Internet of Things (IoT) security, antivirus solutions, endpoint detection and response, URL filtering, application control, network access control, browser isolation, and cloud perimeter security.

Spotlight

Network Box Corporation Limited

The Network Box provides world class managed security services: Monitoring - 24-7 protection of networks worldwide, by trained security analysts, headquartered in a state-of-the-art ISO 9001 / ISO 20000 / 27001 certified Security Operations Centre, and augmented by 12 additional Security Operations Centres across the globe.

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DATA SECURITY

Tips to Protect your Business from Ransomware Attacks

Article | April 11, 2022

“Ransomware is not only about weaponizing encryption, its more about bridging the fractures in the mind with a weaponized message that demands a response from the victim.” - James Scott, Senior Fellow, Institute for Critical Infrastructure Technology Businesses can reduce their vulnerability if they know how to prevent ransomware. While this type of malware does not draw much attention, it can be much more devastating than other types of malware. As ransomware attacks are sophisticated in nature, many larger financial organizations have their own call centers for handling these types of data breaches. Ransomware contributes to 10% of all breaches, but it doubled its frequency in 2021. 37% of global organizations are victims of ransomware attacks. According to the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, 14 of the 16 U.S. critical infrastructure sectors faced ransomware attacks in February 2022. There are more than 130 different ransomware strains detected. Ransomware usually stops the user from using the system, programs, or files. Hackers ask you to pay a ransom to regain control of the PC. You may have to pay to avoid losing everything. As backups may not provide complete protection against ransomware attacks, this malware is considered essential. It shows the importance of depending upon a professional security service. Read the article to know more about how to detect and prevent potential data breaches through ransomware effectively. How to Detect Ransomware Attacks It is hard for traditional antivirus software to detect ransomware because this advanced malware uses a set of complex evasion techniques. Therefore, it has become essential to educate yourself and your employees on ways to detect ransomware before it damages data in your system. Ransomware creators apply advanced social engineering tricks and military-grade encryption algorithms to take control of your system and encrypt your data. Unfortunately, it becomes difficult to recognize which files are infected as the ransomware can scramble files. In 2018, 180,000 users globally had been infected with ransomware. Due to the increasing number of ransomware attacks, it has become imperative to know how to detect and prevent ransomware attacks in time. Below are some of the tips on how to detect ransomware. Through a similar-looking email account, ransomware creators send malicious emails. For example, they use capital letters instead of the small letters in the original email ID. So, it is important to learn how to spot ransomware by paying close attention to the email addresses. Another thing is to check the content of the email thoroughly, especially if it has sensitive information. Modern ransomware creators are so sophisticated that they even cleverly imitate emails and even the writing voice of the institution or person. Do not do anything suggested in the mail content if you sense anything strange. The best thing to do is to call the person or organization involved to check the email's authenticity. If you doubt the authenticity of the email, do not click on the links in the email immediately. Closely assessing the email can give you hints as to whether the email is genuine or not. In addition, you can check for unusual domains and spelling errors in the email. Another effective way to detect ransomware is to be careful while downloading attachments. Ransomware creators hide it in an encrypted zip file. You won’t be able to see the malicious file encrypted until you extract it from the file. Tips to Prevent Ransomware Attacks Avoid Providing Personal Data to Unknown Do not give out personal information if you receive a call, text, or email from an unknown source asking for it. Before a ransomware attack, there is a possibility that cybercriminals may try to obtain personal information. This information can be used to target individuals personally through phishing emails. The goal is to get you to open a malicious attachment or link. Permitting the perpetrators to access data to make their trap more plausible is not a good idea. If a corporation contacts you for information, ignore the request and contact the company on your own to confirm that it is legitimate. Get Security Software Assistance As cybercrime increases it becomes essential to have ransomware protection. Use a comprehensive internet security solution like Kaspersky Internet Security to protect your PC from ransomware. Software stops corrupted files from being downloaded or streamed, preventing ransomware from getting into your system and keeping hackers away. Back up your data It is always a good idea to keep a backup of your data. In case you are hit by ransomware, you will know that your data is safe. Keep everything on a hard drive, but don't leave it attached to your computer while you're not using it. Leaving the hard drive attached to your system can compromise the data if you become a victim of ransomware. The data inside the hard drive can get encrypted. With cloud storage solutions, you can also go back to previous versions of your files. As a result, if ransomware encrypts them, you should be able to restore an unencrypted version using cloud storage. Click Only on Verified Links Clicking links on unfamiliar websites or in spam emails should be avoided. One way for your computer to become infected is through downloads that begin when you click on malicious links. When ransomware infects your computer, it either encrypts your files or locks down your operating system. Once the ransomware has anything to hold as a 'hostage,' it will demand to unlock your files. The simplest solution is to pay the ransoms. However, this is what the criminal wants you to do, and paying the ransom does not guarantee that you will be able to access your device or data. Do Not Download Software from Unknown Websites To make sure that you do not get ransomware, don’t download software or media assets from unknown websites. If you want to download something, go to a site that has been verified and is reputable. Most reputable websites will have trust indicators that you can spot. For example, type “https” into the search field to see if the site uses “https” rather than “http”. A shield or lock symbol may appear in the address bar, to confirm that the site is secure. If it’s something that you want to download for your phone, be sure it's from a trusted source. For example, Android users should download apps from the Google Play Store, while iPhone users should go to the App Store. What to Do in Case You Have Become a Victim of Ransomware What if you've already been under a ransomware attack and you are unaware of it? It's critical to know what to do in the event of a ransomware attack. Here are some easy steps that may help reduce damage to some extent. If you're hit by ransomware, the first thing you should do is disconnect from all networks and the internet. By disconnecting, you isolate your computer and limit the ransomware virus from spreading to other devices. It's advisable to consult a cybersecurity professional before paying ransom to cybercriminals. They will learn the situation and advice you to act accordingly. Summing Up Ransomware is difficult to detect and defend against. Organizations, on the other hand, can take steps to protect their systems and sensitive data by taking necessary precautions. The first thing to do is to educate employees about common red flags and vulnerabilities, set up processes and procedures for preventative monitoring, and install anti-ransomware software and tools. Frequently Asked Questions How does ransomware work? Ransomware encrypts files on a computer and prevents the user or organization from accessing them. This malware encrypts files and demands a ransom for the decryption key. This puts businesses in a situation where paying the ransom is the most convenient way for them to get back the data. Is it possible to remove ransomware? Robust cybersecurity software can be used to decrypt ransomware files. A cybersecurity specialist should assist you at every step of the ransomware eradication process with the ransomware removal tool. However, retrieving all the files may not always be possible. Is it possible to detect ransomware? Ransomware can be identified at the network level by checking for unusual traffic patterns. This can signal a ransomware infestation or malware in general.

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Need for privileged Access Management (PAM) for Businesses

Article | April 11, 2022

“PAM is part of the journey, not the destination, so have a roadmap and make sure you communicate with your team and wider operation, which will allow for your overall security strategy to progress.” - Terence Jackson, Thycotic CISO and Privacy Officer. In a corporate context, "privileged access" refers to special access or capabilities that go beyond the scope of a standard user's profile. With the help of privileged access, businesses can protect their infrastructure and applications, operate more efficiently, and keep important data safe. Privileged access can include human and non-human users but does not necessarily represent a human user. For example, a human user’s privileged access can be domain administrative accounts, superuser accounts, and secure socket shell (SSH) keys. On the other hand, some examples of non-human privileged access are service accounts, application accounts, secrets, and SSH keys. In the last decade, there have been numerous security breaches involving privileged access. Among them are the following: The massive breach happened at the U.S. Office of Personnel Management Bangladesh bank breach The attack on the Ukrainian power grid Uber’s highly publicized breach All of these hacks used privileged credentials to plan, organize, and execute cyber-attacks. Privileged Access Management Privileged access management (PAM) is used by organizations to safeguard against the hazards caused by credential theft and misuse of privilege. PAM refers to a holistic cybersecurity approach that includes people, procedures, and technology for controlling, monitoring, securing, and auditing all human and non-human privileged identities. It also allows actions to be taken throughout an enterprise's information security environment. Privileged access management (PAM) works on the concept of least privilege, where the users have access to what is necessary to accomplish their jobs. The idea of least privilege is generally regarded as a recommended practice in cybersecurity and is a critical component of safeguarding privileged access to high-value data and assets. To cut down on their attack surface, companies may be able to reduce the risk of costly data breaches from hostile insiders or cyberattacks from outside the company. Key Challenges When it comes to protecting, controlling, and monitoring privileged access, organizations face numerous challenges. Some of them are as follows: Many IT organizations rely on manual-intensive, error-prone administrative processes to rotate and update privileged credentials. This can be a costly and inefficient approach. While centralized monitoring and controlling privileged sessions puts the business at risk for compliance violations and cybersecurity threats, enterprises also put the business at risk. Many businesses do not use threat analysis tools, so they cannot proactively remediate security incidents. Organizations often struggle to control privileged user access to social media, Software as a Service (SaaS) applications, cloud platforms, and others. As a result, it creates compliance risks and operational complexity. Attackers can use flaws in the Kerberos authentication protocol to impersonate authorized users and get access to important IT resources and confidential data. Why does Your Business Need PAM? The statistics below highlight, in brief, the necessity of PAM for businesses: 3% of organizations lack a mature approach to access management, resulting in two times the number of breaches U.S. enterprises lose $7.91M from a breach, almost double the global average of $3.68M 56% of breaches take months or longer to discover 49% of organizations don’t have policies for assigning privileged user access 80% of security breaches involve compromised privileged credentials 90% of organizations feel vulnerable to insider attacks Traditional Cybersecurity Vs. Privileged Access Management (PAM) Regrettably, traditional cybersecurity is no longer a viable solution. It is complicated, difficult to manage, too costly, and time-consuming. As a result, businesses have to speed up their transition to simpler solutions that don't depend much on IT staff and have more secure, easy-to-use interfaces. Privileged access management is currently a priority for many CISOs to mitigate the risk of cyberattacks, empower their staff, and safeguard their enterprises from unwanted access. Read on to understand some of the critical reasons why you should shift from traditional cybersecurity to privileged access management (PAM). Quick Response When Privileged Accounts Are Hacked Many businesses are afraid to think about what can happen if an administrator account is compromised. However, it is still possible. All accounts can be hacked. A company can't always rely on administrators to take the proper steps, even if they should. A well-designed PAM (privileged access management) system will safeguard against privileged account attacks. Privileged accounts can be disabled swiftly to prevent further damage. The more quickly threats are addressed, the less damage is done to the system. Zero or Lower Chances of Insider Threats Malicious insiders can be a major threat to the organization. Once someone has accessed your system, your data may be readily compromised. With PAM, an insider's ability to harm your system is significantly restricted. They cannot install malware on machines and access documents and data that they are not authorized to view. Also, they will not be able to change the network settings. Improved Regulatory Compliance Regulations are either constantly changing or upgraded. Businesses must adhere to these standards to avoid substantial fines and penalties. PAM promotes regulatory compliance by giving administrators more power and employees less. Employees who don’t pay much attention may violate these restrictions. Either they are unaware, or they are not concerned. By not giving employees access to things they don't need, it's possible to reduce the chances of regulatory compliance issues. An organization is more likely to be in compliance if it uses privileged access management software and learns how to use it in real life. Lower Chances of Malware Risk Employees may install malware, even without recognizing it. For example, they may download anything from the web or accidentally click on a link in an email. They may also unknowingly permit a download or installation that they should not. Privileged access management prevents employees from making these types of catastrophic errors by restricting them from making such modifications. As a result, potential hazards are decreased, and the assault surface is lowered. Proactive PAM Program Protect Endpoints and Workstations Effectively In a business, every endpoint (laptop, smartphone, tablet, desktop, and server, for example) comes pre-configured with privileges. While built-in administrator accounts assist IT staff in resolving local problems, they also present a significant amount of risk. Attackers attack admin accounts and then go from one workstation to the other, hacking new credentials until they accomplish their objective. Workstations are less likely to be hacked if their local administrative privileges are taken over by a privileged access management program in the early stages. Summing Up Privileged access management (PAM) is a cybersecurity term that refers to the techniques and technologies used to control privileged access and rights in their accounts, processes, and systems in an IT environment. Privileged access management helps businesses reduce their attack surface and prevent data breaches. It can, at least, lessen the damage caused by outside threats and internal misuse or neglect. Frequently Asked Questions Is there any difference between IAM and PAM? IAM, also known as identity and access management, is concerned with the management of all users. On the other hand, PAM makes sure that administrative and privileged users can have access to specific information. It can be done by defining and regulating the roles of the admin users. Why do businesses need PAM? PAM allows enterprises to protect themselves against accidental or deliberate misuse of privileged access by facilitating the authorization and monitoring of privileged users Who is a privileged user? A user who is permitted (and hence trusted) to perform duties that involve sensitive data. Regular users do not usually perform these duties.

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NETWORK THREAT DETECTION

Top Cybersecurity Threats and Vulnerabilities to Keep an Eye On

Article | March 31, 2022

Cybersecurity threats and vulnerabilities are prevalent in all types of businesses, from Fortune 500 companies to mom-and-pop shops. The basic fact is that there are far too many risks to counteract all of them adequately. According to Kaspersky Lab, a leading antivirus company, “The number of new malicious files processed by Kaspersky Lab’s in-lab detection technologies reached 360,000 a day in 2017.” This contributes to 250 new malware threats every minute. When it comes to cybersecurity threats and network vulnerabilities, malware is not the only thing to be worried about. Hackers can steal your data and sensitive information. Cybersecurity Threats and Vulnerabilities: The Difference To put it simply, vulnerabilities are weaknesses or flaws in a system or network that could be exploited to bring harm or allow an attacker to manipulate the system in some way. This differs from a cyber-threat. Computer system vulnerabilities are the weaknesses and flaws present in the system, unlike a cyber threat. Cybercriminals will also use these flaws in their attacks, but they aren't usually the result of a deliberate plan. I short, vulnerabilities lead to cybersecurity threats. How a computer cybersecurity vulnerability is exploited is determined by the nature of the exposure and the attacker's motivations. For example, these problems could be caused by software programs that don't work well together, system parts that don't work well together, or flaws in a single application. Top Cybersecurity Threats and Vulnerabilities of the Year Internet of Thing Devices The Internet of Things (IoT) includes many smart devices, such as Wi-Fi-equipped refrigerators, printers, factory robots, coffee makers, and countless other appliances. The challenge with these devices is that attackers can use them to create slaved networks of compromised devices to carry out additional attacks. Worse yet, many firms are unaware of how many IoT devices they have on their networks. This means they are unaware of the risks and possible threats they are exposed to, as well as the vulnerabilities to information security. These unknown devices provide countless opportunities for attackers and increase the vulnerability risk in cybersecurity for corporations. To reduce the network security threats and vulnerabilities of IoT devices, a security audit should be conducted that identifies the diverse assets of the network and the operating systems they use. In this manner, the company's cybersecurity plan can effectively account for these IoT devices. In addition, audits like these should be done regularly to account for any new devices added to the network over time. Phishing Attacks or Social Engineering In a phishing attack, the attacker tries to persuade an employee of the targeted organization to divulge important information and account credentials by prompting them to download malware. The most common attack is through identical emails from one of your company's vendors or someone from a higher level. One such example of a phishing email is: "This is Mark from IT. Your user account has shown unusual behavior. Please click this link to reset and secure your password." When you click the link in the email, it directs users to a website that downloads malware and compromises their machine. Other phishing scams may try to get people to handover their user account credentials to the attacker to resolve a problem. Malware New malware is generated regularly. The figure of 360,000 new malware files every day may appear alarming. Many of these new malware files are simply rehashes of earlier malware programs that have been tweaked just enough to make them unidentifiable to antivirus software. However, numerous new types of malware have been developed over time, such as ransomware, trojans, and worms, each uniquely affecting the target's systems. Security Vulnerabilities That Are Unpatched As new sophisticated threats are produced regularly, companies have to find sophisticated ways to tackle them perfectly. Malware is looking to exploit the same cybersecurity threats and vulnerabilities repeatedly. Failing to patch those cybersecurity vulnerabilities, once they're discovered, it can be dangerous for companies. It's all too usual for a company—or even individual users on a network—to ignore the ‘update available’ warnings that appear in some programs because they don't want to waste the 5-10 minutes to perform the update. These updates can save a company a lot of time and money and save from threats. Thus, it is good for companies to update programs regularly. Backdoor Programs that Are Hidden This is an example of a computer cybersecurity vulnerability that was purposefully engineered. Usually, a backdoor is a piece of software or code that is installed by the manufacturer of computer parts, software, or entire machines. This allows the manufacturer to access a computer remotely for diagnostic, configuration, or technical support purposes. A hidden backdoor program installs a backdoor into a computer without the knowledge of the user. Secret backdoors are a significant software flaw because it is easy to gain unauthorized access and affect the computer system and the networks to which it is connected. Employees The employees working for an organization are considered to be cybersecurity vulnerabilities. Most data breaches can be traced back to an employee due to intentional mistake or an accident. Employees, for example, may take advantage of their access credentials for personal gain. Alternatively, an employee could click on the wrong link in an email, download the wrong file from a website, or give the wrong person their user account credentials, giving attackers simple access to your systems. Using a least privilege policy, for example, prevents users from having too much data at once, making it difficult for them to steal data. Another benefit of cybersecurity awareness training is that it helps employees recognize phishing and other social engineering-style attacks and not fall for them. Software or Programming Interfaces With Unknown Security Flaws Computer software is complicated to comprehend. The complexity of a system grows exponentially as two or more programs interact with one another. The problem is that there may be programming flaws and conflicts inside a single piece of software, resulting in cybersecurity threats and vulnerabilities. When two applications are linked together, the chance of disputes that result in software flaws increases. Programming errors and unexpected code interactions are the most frequent cybersecurity vulnerabilities. Cybercriminals constantly seek new ways to exploit them. Unfortunately, forecasting the emergence of these threats and vulnerabilities to information security is not possible because of the infinite number of software combinations that can exist on a single computer, let alone an entire network. 3 Ways to Find and Prevent Cybersecurity Threats and Vulnerabilities Identifying vulnerabilities in cybersecurity before an attacker can exploit is one of the essential steps in preventing a security breach. Many firms, however, does not have the tools and expertise to identify network security threats and vulnerabilities. Here are some ways to find threats and vulnerabilities in information security: Audit Your Network Assets Penetration Testing Create a Threat Intelligence Framework Summing Up Cybersecurity threats and vulnerabilities have become too sophisticated as our dependency on digital technologies grows. It is because of this companies that use outdated cybersecurity techniques are at a risk of being hacked. Organizations must improve their cybersecurity program to avoid risks. An effective cybersecurity program can assist firms in preventing attacks, reducing recovery time, and containing future risks. Frequently Asked Questions What do you mean by cyber threats and vulnerability? Vulnerabilities are gaps in a system that allow threats to occur and let threat actors take advantage of the data. It is called a threat when the chance of an attack is multiplied by the possible loss. What are some of the vulnerabilities in cybersecurity? Network vulnerabilities, operating system vulnerabilities, human vulnerabilities, and process vulnerabilities are some of the vulnerabilities in cybersecurity. What is the difference between vulnerability and threat? A threat is a process that increases the possibility of an adverse event, such as a vulnerability being exploited. On the other hand, exposure is a flaw in your infrastructure, networks, or apps that could expose you to threats.

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Ways to Prevent Top Social Engineering Techniques

Article | March 30, 2022

‘Social engineering bypasses all technologies, including firewalls.” - Kevin Mitnick, an author and computer security consultant from the United States Social engineering is an attempt by attackers to trick or manipulate individuals into handing over access, passwords, financial or other sensitive information. It's a cyber-threat that exploits the weak link in the security chain to obtain access to company networks. Attackers use sophisticated deception and emotional manipulation to get workers, even top executives, to provide critical information. Phishing is the most common type of social engineering technique. 43% of IT experts report that they have been scammed in the last few years. 93% of successful data breaches result from social engineering attacks. 45% of workers click on suspicious emails thinking "just in case it's essential." 71% of IT experts report seeing workers fall for a social engineering attack. Social engineering assaults cost an average of $130,000 to any company. 60% of IT workers think that new employees are likely to fall for social engineering scams. 45% of workers fail to report suspicious emails and messages for fear of repercussions. Cyberattacks that are socially engineered are less than 80% successful. Business email compromise is the most expensive socially engineered attack - 64 times more expensive than ransomware! “Companies spend millions of dollars on firewalls, encryption, and secure access devices, and its money wasted; none of these measures address the weakest link in the security chain.” – Kevin Mitnick, computer security consultant and author from the United States Even though millions of dollars are spent on cutting-edge perimeters and end-point security systems, determined hackers can get into enterprise networks through human elements every day. How Does Social Engineering Affect Businesses? Successful social engineering has a catastrophic impact on a firm. When confidential information about customers, enterprises, finance, and personal details is compromised, your company's reputation and goodwill are at risk. Successful cyberattacks affect businesses in different ways, such as: Financial losses Loss of productivity The cost of recovering Cyber-attacks cause business disruption Social engineering hacks cause massive damage to your reputation Learn about the top social engineering attacks and how to protect against them. Top Social Engineering Techniques and How to Prevent Them Phishing In phishing, attackers send messages through social media, emails, SMS, or instant messaging to clients to trick users. This way, they make the user click on links that lead to malicious websites. Phishing messages capture a victim's attention and prompt them to act by stimulating curiosity, requesting assistance, or eliciting other emotional responses. In addition, they often use logos, photos, or writing styles to make it look like the communication came from a colleague, the victim's bank, or other legitimate source. Most phishing communications use a feeling of urgency to convince the victim that there would be severe repercussions if they did not immediately hand over critical information. Prevention Tips for Phishing Know what a phishing scam looks like Don’t click on strange links Get free anti-phishing add-ons Never give your information to an unsecured site Change passwords regularly Install firewalls Baiting Baiting attacks usually involve luring the victim by generating curiosity or offering a hard-to-refuse deal. For example, social engineers may send an email with an attachment or a free download/sample link that promises lucrative deals. This would install malware on the recipients' systems when clicked. Social engineers who access the location may also put USB devices on an employee's workstation to trigger curiosity. When the employee inserts the USB drive onto their computer to inspect its contents, malware is installed on their PCs. Social engineers may use the malware to control and access data once the malware gets installed on the computer. Preventive Measures for Baiting Companies should teach employees to recognize if an offer seems too good to be true. Encourage employees to ask questions (if in doubt) before sharing any personal information. Ensure all employees in the organization use antimalware and antivirus software on their systems. Set up network security measures to stop incidents even before they happen Pretexting Although more focused, pretexting social engineering attacks are similar to phishing attempts. The social engineer constructs a fictional setting by impersonating an authoritative, well-known, or trustworthy person. The social engineer wants to gain confidence by pretending to be genuine and persuades the victim to share information. Once the social engineer gets the information they want, they may execute further deception. For example, acting as if a customer needs urgent account information. How to Prevent Pretexting Teach employees the business rules and security best practices Make sure employees always check with management before disclosing sensitive information Have a clear-cut policy to handle suspected attacks Avoid clicking on unknown links shared via emails or other sources Spear Phishing Spear phishing is a more advanced kind of social engineering in which communications are more targeted, well-written, and addressed to a single individual or group of people. Criminals personalize and modify emails for their intended recipients. The subject lines are unique and will include relevant themes for the receivers. It's no surprise that spear-phishing emails are responsible for 91% of successful breaches. Unfortunately, email security filters and receivers may overlook the communication because they are well-tailored. In addition, the communication appears genuine and non-aggressive. The spear-phishing email's developer makes an effort to obtain precise information on the target. Such information may be found in company directories or on websites like LinkedIn. After that, the hacker may gather more personal data from social networking sites to fine-tune a spear-phishing email. How to Defend Spear Phishing Train users to recognize, avoid, and report suspicious emails. Security teams must develop, manage, and upgrade security technologies and practices to prevent, identify, and react to ever-evolving spear-phishing attacks. Security teams must invest in continuously updating threat information to employees to stay ahead of attackers. Vishing In vishing, the hacker pretends to call from a bank, merchant account, or another service. The phone call starts with an automated message that directs the callers to the criminals acting as customer support representatives. To fake or disguise their phone numbers, criminals use smartphone applications or other technologies. Vishing is a kind of social engineering attack in which the victim is deceived into disclosing personal, financial, or business information. The attacker may even act as an off-site executive from your organization. Preventive Measures for Vishing Verify unexpected phone requests using an official directory or call the company’s main office and ask to speak to the person making the request. Login credentials should not be disclosed over the phone. If a caller requests account or personal information, do not share it and inform the security. You will not be contacted by security to change your logins, passwords, or network settings. Any caller who makes such a request is most likely a hacker. Decline the call and alert the authorities. Summing Up Cognitive biases and fundamental human decision-making play a significant role in social engineering strategy. As humans, we are bound to make mistakes. Building awareness will help you make the perfect decision at the right time. This will guard your business and loss of reputation. Cybercriminals who use social engineering campaigns are aware of human psychology and use it to their benefit. Unfortunately, such cyber attacks may affect your company if a lot of data is compromised or there is a ransomware attack. Recognizing typical social engineering tactics is the first step in strengthening your security measures and avoiding data leaks. Next, make sure your personnel are trained on how to deal with potential dangers so you can have the most effective defense possible. Frequently Asked Questions What are some of the examples of social engineering attacks? Some of the examples of social engineering attacks are: Quid Pro Quo Tailgating Smishing What do you mean by social engineering attacks? Social engineering attacks take advantage of human mistakes to get passwords or spread malware, usually through infected email attachments or malicious website links. What are the six fundamental principles of social engineering? The six fundamental principles of social engineering are commitment and consistency, reciprocity, social proof, authority, scarcity, and liking.

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