Top Riskiest Employee Practices that are a threat to Information Security

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According to “The Human Factor in Data Protection" study, the most common causes of data loss is loss of laptops or other mobile devices, third party mishaps or flubs and system glitches. Only 8% of incidents were the result of outside actors. the most common causes of data loss is loss of laptops or other mobile devices, third party mishaps or flubs and system glitches. Only 8% of incidents were the result of outside actors. Here are the most common examples of risky practices routinely adopted by employees: 1Putting Company Data at Risk over Free Public Wi-Fi 2Not securing confidential information 3Sharing passwords with others 4Using the same name and password for different websites or online accounts 5Using generic USB to store confidential information 6Leaving computer unattended while away from workplace 60.9 % admit they will utilize any free Wi-Fi source they can find.

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Mitigating Risks with Social Media Security Best Practices

Article | September 27, 2021

Social media has become an integral part of business promotion, especially to build brand image and maintain brand reputation. Small businesses to large corporations are active on various social media platforms to interact with their target audience daily. Moreover, the onset of the Pandemic has compelled businesses to rely more on these platforms to connect with their world of customers. This has skyrocketed the amount of information businesses, and customers share on social media. As a result, social media security threats have increased. Hackers are looking for a chance to get into accounts, steal personal and business information, and use it for various gains. Publically accessible social media information is vulnerable to cyber-attacks from cybercriminals. To communicate with customers directly, corporations today operate multiple social media channels. However, cybersecurity measures have to be ensured within the organizations while accessing the channels to increase security. The commonly used safety models, such as the Least-Privileged Administrative model, can be applied in organizations to ensure security. In addition, social media access to employees should be minimized. Taking necessary steps to increase social media security in organizations will help in avoiding deliberate sabotage. However, taking no care in this matter may jeopardize your business, as your company's platforms will be vulnerable to malpractices and attacks by cybercriminals. These factors make social media security vital than ever before. Let us look into some social media security threats and mitigate them through adequate cybersecurity best practices. Social Media Security Threats Third-party Apps Even if you ensure a hundred percentages of security for your social media channels, hackers can quickly get into your account through vulnerable third-party apps. International Olympics Committee and FC Barcelona were victims of it. Twitter accounts of these organizations were hacked through vulnerabilities of connected third-party apps. You cannot foresee how dangerous the third-party apps you use are. Malware Cyber adversaries trick their targets into installing malware to systems and start to control and monitor it. This way, they get sensitive information. Phishing Scams Phishing scams can quickly get into your social media security walls. Phishing scams make employees of organizations hand over information to frauds unknowingly. These can be private information such as passwords, bank details, etc. Unattended accounts Organizations are likely to use some accounts for some time and ignore them after a while. Cyber hackers are targeting these accounts, as they know no one is watching them. Even without hacking, they can post fraudulent messages on those accounts. They use an imposter account for it. They even can send malicious links from these unattended accounts to your followers. Therefore, these unmonitored accounts are a huge threat to your social media security. Social Media Security Tips Above mentioned are some of the social media security threats that corporations face while handling social media pages to interact with tier customers. However, following a social media strategy with stringent social media security best practices can save your company from these frauds and criminals. Cybersecurity products are also available to secure your online activities and business. Social Media Policy All organizations should have an effective social media strategy with a social media security policy for employees, especially those handling the profiles. The guidelines in this policy will make your social media executives handle the accounts safely. Additionally, it will save you from various vulnerabilities that make criminals break into your social media security walls. Social Media Security Audit Due to the technology improving every second, new vulnerabilities, threats, and new hacking tactics emerge. In addition, criminals are also coming up with new viruses, strategies, and scams to hack social media accounts. Thus, it is always good to audit the social media security measures implemented in your company. The audit should be done often, such as quarterly or semi-quarterly. This will ensure that your social media security measures are strong enough to fight new-age hackers. Strong Passwords Strong passwords alone can fight any social media security breaches and cybersecurity threats. Therefore, you have to ensure that you have a strong password for each of your accounts. Your employees should be educated regarding what constitutes a strong password. In addition, it is a good practice to change your password often. Two-factor Authentication According to privacy advocate of Comparitech, Paul Bischoff, two-way authentication is the best way to keep all your social media accounts secure. He says, Whenever an employee logs in from a new device, they are required to input a PIN sent to the account owner via an app, SMS, or email. This not only protects you from stolen passwords but can ensure that whoever is in charge of the accounts is present when logging in on new devices. Although some social media channels provide this facility, it is better to enable it for all your accounts with all the channels to ensure social media security. Summing up Social media is an integral part of business today. Companies need it to interact with customers to build brand image. However, social media security is a concern as technology is improving every second. Criminals are upgrading themselves with new tactics and techniques to hack accounts. Therefore, it is vital to follow and ensure stringent social media security best practices for your accounts to confirm your business's safety, avoiding going sensitive information to the wrong hands. Frequently Asked Questions Are social media channels safe for businesses? Social media is an integral part of marketing today. Therefore, it has to be handled with utmost care and vigilance. It will harm your business if you do not adhere to essential social media security measures, as hackers can get into your accounts quickly. What are some of the social media threats for businesses? There are many social media threats for businesses. Some are unmonitored social media accounts, imposter accounts, vulnerable third-party apps, human error, and phishing attacks and scams. { "@context": "https://schema.org", "@type": "FAQPage", "mainEntity": [{ "@type": "Question", "name": "Are social media channels safe for businesses?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "Social media is an integral part of marketing today. Therefore, it has to be handled with utmost care and vigilance. It will harm your business if you do not adhere to essential social media security measures, as hackers can get into your accounts quickly." } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": "What are some of the social media threats for businesses?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "There are many social media threats for businesses. Some are unmonitored social media accounts, imposter accounts, vulnerable third-party apps, human error, and phishing attacks and scams." } }] }

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We Need to Improve Cybersecurity Standards in Space

Article | September 27, 2021

Last month, SpaceX became the operator of the world’s largest active satellite constellation. As of the end of January, the company had 242 satellites orbiting the planet with plans to launch 42,000 over the next decade. This is part of its ambitious project to provide internet access across the globe. The race to put satellites in space is on, with Amazon, UK-based OneWeb and other companies chomping at the bit to place thousands of satellites in orbit in the coming months. These new satellites have the potential to revolutionise many aspects of everyday life – from bringing internet access to remote corners of the globe to monitoring the environment and improving global navigation systems. Amid all the fanfare, a critical danger has flown under the radar: the lack of cybersecurity standards and regulations for commercial satellites, in the US and internationally. As a scholar who studies cyber conflict, I’m keenly aware that this, coupled with satellites’ complex supply chains and layers of stakeholders, leaves them highly vulnerable to cyberattacks.

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How Organizations can prepare for Cybersecurity

Article | September 27, 2021

According to a Gartner study in 2018, the global Cybersecurity market is estimated to be as big as US$170.4 billion by 2022. The rapid growth in cybersecurity market is boosted by new technological initiatives like cloud-based applications and workloads that require security beyond the traditional data centres, the internet of things devices, and data protection mandates like EU’s GDPR. Cybersecurity, at its core, is protecting information and systems from cyberthreats that come in many forms like ransomware, malware, phishing attacks and exploit kits. Technological advancements have unfortunately opened as many opportunities to cybercriminals as it has for the authorities. These negative elements are now capable of launching sophisticated cyberattacks at a reduced cost. Therefore, it becomes imperative for organizations across all industries to incorporate latest technologies to stay ahead of the cybercriminals. Table of Contents: - What is the cybersecurity scenario around the world? - Driving Management Awareness towards Cybersecurity - Preparing Cybersecurity Workforce - Cybersecurity Awareness for Other Employees - Conclusion What is the cybersecurity scenario around the world? Even as there has been a steady increase in cyberattacks, according to the 2018 Global State of Information Security Survey from PwC: 44% companies across the world do not have an overall information security strategy, 48% executives said they do not have an employee security awareness training program, and 54% said they do not have an incident response process. So, where does the problem lie? Many boards still see it as an IT problem. Matt Olsen, Co-Founder and President of Business Development and Strategy, IronNet Cybersecurity. Cybersecurity The greater responsibility of building a resilient cybersecurity of an organization lies with its leaders. There is a need to eliminate the stigma of ‘risk of doing business lies solely with the technology leaders of an organization. Oversight and proactive risk management must come under CEO focus. According to the National Association of Corporate Directors' 2016-2017 surveys of public and private company directors, very few leaders felt confident about their security against cyberattacks, perhaps due to their lack of involvement into the subject. Driving Management Awareness towards Cybersecurity • Gain buy-in by mapping security initiatives back to business objectives and explaining security in ways that speak to the business • Update management about your current activities pertaining to the security initiatives taken, recent news about breaches and resolve any doubts. • Illustrate the security maturity of your organization by using audit findings along with industry benchmarks such as BSIMM to show management how your organization fares and how you plan to improve, given their support. • Running awareness program for your management regarding spear-phishing, ransomware and other hacking campaigns that aim for executives and teach how to avoid them. The bottom line is that leaders can seize the opportunity now to take meaningful actions designed to bolster the resilience of their organizations, withstand disruptive cyber threats and build a secure digital society. The bottom line is that leaders can seize the opportunity now to take meaningful actions designed to bolster the resilience of their organizations, withstand disruptive cyber threats and build a secure digital society.. Pwc READ MORE: WEBROOT: WIDESPREAD LACK OF CYBERSECURITY BEST PRACTICES /11029 Preparing Cybersecurity Workforce Hackers are able to find 75% of the vulnerabilities within the application layer. Thus, developers have an important role to play in the cybersecurity of an organization and are responsible for the security of their systems. Training insecure codingis the best way to raise their cybersecurity awareness levels. Raising Cybersecurity Awareness in Developers: • Training developers to code from the attackers’ point of view, using specific snippets from your own apps. • Explain in-depth about vulnerabilities found by calling remedial sessions. • Find ways to make secure coding easier on developers, like integrating security testing and resources into their workflow and early in the SDLC/ • Seek feedback from developers on how your security policies fit into their workflow and find ways to improve. Cybersecurity Awareness for Other Employees According to the Online Trust Alliance’s2016 Data Protection and Breach Readiness Guide, employees cause about 30% of data breaches. Employees are the weakest link in the cybersecurity chain. But that can be changed by creating awareness and educating them on the risks surrounding equipment, passwords, social media, the latest social engineering ploys, and communications and collaboration tools.Make standard security tasks part of their everyday routine, including updating antivirus software and privacy settings, and taking steps as simple as covering cameras when they end a video conference call. Conclusion: The technological advancements are moving faster than anF-16, so the measure are by no means exhaustive. The important thing is to keep pace with numerous cybersecurity measures to not fall prey to a cyberattack. Every organizational level plays an important role in achieving a matured security infrastructure, thus making awareness and participation mandatory. Organizations should consider a natively integrated, automated security platform specifically designed to provide consistent, prevention-based protection for endpoints, data centers, networks, public and private clouds, and software-as-a-service environments READ MORE: A 4 STEP GUIDE TO STRONGER OT CYBERSECURITY

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Critical Gaps Remain in Defense Department Weapons System Cybersecurity

Article | September 27, 2021

While the U.S. military is the most effective fighting force in the modern era, it struggles with the cybersecurity of its most advanced weapons systems. In times of crisis and conflict, it is critical that the United States preserve its ability to defend and surge when adversaries employ cyber capabilities to attack weapons systems and functions. Today, the very thing that makes these weapons so lethal is what makes them vulnerable to cyberattacks: an interconnected system of software and networks. Continued automation and connectivity are the backbone of the Department of Defense’s warfighting capabilities, with almost every weapons system connected in some capacity. Today, these interdependent networks are directly linked to the U.S. military’s ability to carry out missions successfully, allowing it to gain informational advantage, exercise global command and control, and conduct long-range strikes. An example of such a networked system is the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, which the Air Force chief of staff, Gen. David Goldfein, once called “a computer that happens to fly.” Underpinning this platform’s unrivaled capability is more than 8 million lines of software code.

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Radware is a global leader of application delivery and cyber security solutions for virtual, cloud and software defined data centers. Our award-winning solutions portfolio delivers service level assurance for business-critical applications, while maximizing IT efficiency. Radware solutions empower more than 10,000 enterprise and carrier customers worldwide to adapt to market challenges quickly, maintain business continuity and achieve maximum productivity while keeping costs down.

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