What is NotPetya? How to Prevent this Virus from Infecting

| November 22, 2018

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NotPetya virus outwardly resembles the Petya ransomware in many ways, however, the fact is that it’s different and a lot more dangerous than Petya. When Petya affected numerous systems even the best antivirus and virus removal programs failed to deduct it. It brought many systems to a grinding halt for a while until the virus protection programs could get the updates on the new ransomware. Petya – What is it? Petya belongs to the family of encrypting ransomware and it was first identified in the year 2016. The malicious code was created to attack the Microsoft Windows-based computers. Basically, it infects the master boot record of a Windows machine to execute a payload that encrypts a hard drive’s file system table. This prevents the Windows machine from booting. Consequently, the user is shown a message demanding to make a payment in Bitcoin to regain access to their system.

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OTHER ARTICLES

Security by Sector: Improving Quality of Data and Decision-Making a Priority for Credit Industry

Article | February 17, 2020

The subject of how information security impacts different industry sectors is an intriguing one. For example, how does the finance industry fare in terms of information security compared to the health sector, or the entertainment business? Are there some sectors that face greater cyber-threats and risks than others? Do some do a better job of keeping data secure, and if so, how and why?A new study of credit management professionals has revealed that improving the quality of data and decision-making will be a top priority for the credit industry in the next three years. The research, from Equifax Ingnite in collaboration with Coleman Parkes, takes a deep dive into the views of credit management pros across retail, banking, finance and debt management/recovery sectors.

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Article | February 22, 2020

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Article | April 9, 2020

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Article | February 20, 2020

Technology is reshaping society – artificial intelligence (AI) is enabling us to increase crop yields, protect endangered animals and improve access to healthcare. Technology is also transforming criminal enterprises, which are developing increasingly targeted attacks against a growing range of devices and services. Using the cloud to harness the largest and most diverse set of signals – with the right mix of AI and human defenders – we can turn the tide in cybersecurity. Microsoft is announcing new capabilities in AI and automation available today to accelerate that change. Cybersecurity always comes down to people – good and bad. Our optimism is grounded in our belief in the potential for good people and technology to work in harmony to accomplish amazing things. After years of investment and engineering work, the data now shows that Microsoft is delivering on the potential of AI to enable defenders to protect data and manage risk across the full breadth of their digital estates.

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Cogeco Peer 1

Technology takes people, too. Data. Networking. Servers. Cogeco Peer 1 helps keep small start-ups to Fortune 100 companies from around the world connected and up and running, 24/7. We’re technicians. Experts. Innovators. Always on. Always there. Our goal: help make our customers unstoppable.

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