2018 Is a Year Huawei Would Like to Forget

SDNCentral | December 26, 2018

2018 Is a Year Huawei Would Like to Forget
It would be an understatement to say 2018 was not a good year for Huawei. Things started going south early in January and only got worse as the year progressed. After months of troubles, the year culminated with the company’s CFO, who also happens to be the founder’s daughter, getting arrested in Canada at the behest of the U.S. government. Huawei’s misfortunes in 2018 began from concerns that the company’s telecommunications equipment could be used for cyber espionage. For that reason, the company became a target of U.S. politicians. Then its troubles became inextricably connected with tensions between the United States and China over trade and tariffs. Finally, toward the end of the year, the U.S. government accused Huawei of circumventing sanctions to sell telecom equipment to Iran.

Spotlight

In a short two years, it is safe to say that the prospect of cybercrime has suddenly shifted to be a top concern for many decision makers around the world. It started with the explosive hacks that rocked companies like Sony, JP Morgan, Target, and other well-known brands. More recently, it was the release of thousands of hacked emails from the DNC and John Podesta, along with the allegations of Russian hacking, that has led the news cycle. As a result, it is not surprising that much of today’s narrative on cybercrime is centered around the devastating potential of external threats to countries or businesses. The reality is, however, that there is a whole other side of things to consider.

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NTT Application Security, the New Name for WhiteHat Security

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Companies migrate to the cloud and MSSPs helping to secure these multi-cloud environments

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Spotlight

In a short two years, it is safe to say that the prospect of cybercrime has suddenly shifted to be a top concern for many decision makers around the world. It started with the explosive hacks that rocked companies like Sony, JP Morgan, Target, and other well-known brands. More recently, it was the release of thousands of hacked emails from the DNC and John Podesta, along with the allegations of Russian hacking, that has led the news cycle. As a result, it is not surprising that much of today’s narrative on cybercrime is centered around the devastating potential of external threats to countries or businesses. The reality is, however, that there is a whole other side of things to consider.