11 Ways to Defeat Two-Factor Authentication

KnowBe4

Everyone knows that two-factor authentication (2FA) is more secure than a simple login name and password, but too many people think that 2FA is a perfect, unhackable solution. It isn't! Join Roger A. Grimes, KnowBe4's Data-Driven Defense Evangelist, and security expert with over 30-years experience, for this webinar where he will explore 11 ways hackers can and do get around your favorite 2FA solution. The webinar includes a (pre-filmed) hacking demo by KnowBe4's Chief Hacking Officer Kevin Mitnick, and real-life successful examples of every attack type. It will end by telling you how to better defend your 2FA solution so that you get maximum benefit and security.
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Spotlight

A majority of computer security breaches occur because internal employees of an organization subvert existing controls. While exploring the issue of violation of safeguards by trusted personnel, with specific reference to Barings Bank and the activities of Nicholas Leeson, this paper provides an understanding of related information security concerns. In a final synthesis, guidelines are provided which organizations could use to prevent computer security breaches. Businesses today are experiencing a problem with managing information security. This is so not only because of increased reliance of individuals and businesses on information and communication technologies, but also because the attempts to manage information security have been rather skewed towards implementing increasingly complex technological controls. The importance of technological controls should not be underplayed, but evidence suggests that the violation of safeguards by trusted personnel of an organization is emerging as a primary reason for information security concerns. Between 61 and 81% of computer related crimes are being carried out because of such violations (see Dhillon [5]; Dhillon and Backhouse [6] for a detailed discussion). These insiders could be dishonest or disgruntled employees who would copy, steal, or sabotage information, yet their actions may remain undetected.

OTHER ON-DEMAND WEBINARS

After updatein The Expanding Attack Surface: 5 Tips to Manage Third-Party Risk

BitSight

As organizations increase their reliance on third-party vendors for outsourced solutions, they expand their attack surface. Today’s digital environment offers tremendous opportunities for modern organizations. At the same time, there is more risk. Vulnerabilities and infections plague organizations around the globe — and their numbers continue to rise. The tips discussed in this webinar will help you start managing third-party risk to centralize your program and get a preliminary perspective of the risks you face. Once this foundation is established, you can build on it and shift to a more proactive approach to managing third-party risk — and limiting your exposure.
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Cyberthreats in the Internet of Things

Hlmediacomms

On July 16, 2019, Nathan Salminen, Allison Holt, and Paul Otto from the Hogan Lovells Privacy and Cybersecurity and Litigation teams presented a webinar, “Cyberthreats in the Internet of Things” where they explored some techniques that can be used to exploit potential vulnerabilities in connected devices and how those types of events impact organizations from a regulatory and litigation perspective. Many of the nearly 20 billion Internet of Things (IoT) devices deployed worldwide perform critical functions or have access to networks that process highly sensitive information. The proliferation of connected devices across industry sectors has led to the emergence of a significant and distinct threat to many types of organizations, from electric utilities deploying IoT devices across its smart grid to financial institutions using IoT devices in conference rooms that may connect to the same network that financial data flows through.
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Why Use a Cloud Managed Service Provider?

FuseForward

If you’re about to embark on your cloud journey, the first decision you will need to make is whether to undertake the project in-house or outsource it to a Managed Service Provider (MSP). To help you make this important decision, we’ve recorded a free on-demand webinar. In twenty minutes, our CEO Mark Damm and Solutions Engineer Ray Jung, will walk you through the ways an MSP can help address your key cloud concerns.
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Security by Design—Full Life Cycle Container Security that Matches the Speed of DevOps

Trend Micro

Join Trend Micro’s Sr. Product Manager for Hybrid Cloud Security, Kyle Klassen, and Sr. Software Developer, Geoff Baskwill for our webinar: Security by Design—Full Life Cycle Container Security that Matches the Speed of DevOps. They will outline the key steps and tools that will help you artfully automate full life cycle container security, including useful APIs, image scanning and runtime protection to detect problems early and mitigate against attacks targeting your host, Docker®, and Kubernetes® platforms and containers.
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Spotlight

A majority of computer security breaches occur because internal employees of an organization subvert existing controls. While exploring the issue of violation of safeguards by trusted personnel, with specific reference to Barings Bank and the activities of Nicholas Leeson, this paper provides an understanding of related information security concerns. In a final synthesis, guidelines are provided which organizations could use to prevent computer security breaches. Businesses today are experiencing a problem with managing information security. This is so not only because of increased reliance of individuals and businesses on information and communication technologies, but also because the attempts to manage information security have been rather skewed towards implementing increasingly complex technological controls. The importance of technological controls should not be underplayed, but evidence suggests that the violation of safeguards by trusted personnel of an organization is emerging as a primary reason for information security concerns. Between 61 and 81% of computer related crimes are being carried out because of such violations (see Dhillon [5]; Dhillon and Backhouse [6] for a detailed discussion). These insiders could be dishonest or disgruntled employees who would copy, steal, or sabotage information, yet their actions may remain undetected.

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