2018 Cybersecurity Headlines in Review

Infocyte

2018 was a particularly busy year for the cybersecurity industry… Beyond the exponential growth in the number and types of cyber-attacks—including Magecart, which compromised the payment processing systems for a number of large companies—hundreds of new cybersecurity startups were formed, GDPR came to pass, and the impacts of Big Data processing on social networks exploded. During this webinar, Michael Hill and Dan Raywood of Infosecurity Magazine (including a few guest speakers) review the trends of 2018, the impact of those cybersecurity trends, and predictions for 2019. In the 2018 Cybersecurity Headlines in Review webinar, we’ll explore: Cybersecurity headlines in 2018 and what trends were most publicized.
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Spotlight

We show you the type of attack, or rather the type of vulnerability, the component, and how many times it occurred. Here, the alert, again, while it shows you things like the resolution and the references, the path that it existed in, the method in which this was invoked, there's some actual cool stuff that we show here on the right hand side. We collect things like the method. In this case, it was a post. The confidence level, the evidence, but we also show you the request and response. Here you can see what the request header was, the request body, the response header, as well as the response body. Now from a developer's perspective, if they wanted to replay this, we provide this really nifty command, or rather curl command. When you click this, you actually get a curl command with the actual post url, as well as all the header parameters that were passed to it to be able to simulate this on your local development environment. This makes it very easy for the developer to be able to see what's going on.

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Spotlight

We show you the type of attack, or rather the type of vulnerability, the component, and how many times it occurred. Here, the alert, again, while it shows you things like the resolution and the references, the path that it existed in, the method in which this was invoked, there's some actual cool stuff that we show here on the right hand side. We collect things like the method. In this case, it was a post. The confidence level, the evidence, but we also show you the request and response. Here you can see what the request header was, the request body, the response header, as well as the response body. Now from a developer's perspective, if they wanted to replay this, we provide this really nifty command, or rather curl command. When you click this, you actually get a curl command with the actual post url, as well as all the header parameters that were passed to it to be able to simulate this on your local development environment. This makes it very easy for the developer to be able to see what's going on.

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