How to Leverage Hacking Competitions as an Educational and Recruitment Tool

HealthcareInfoSecurity

One of the most-heard complaints from security experts is that often they find their work repetitive ("The CFO's laptop has been compromised... again!"), which results in the desire of trying something "new", meaning "leave for another company." Another common complaint is that the work is very compartmentalized, and there are few occasions in which the various security specialists can enjoy working as a team. One activity that can help build a team while improving the security skills of the people involved is participating in Capture the Flag (CTF) hacking competitions. In 2003 at the University of California at Santa Barbara, one of the world's largest attack-defense CTF competitions began and has grown year-after-year, pushing the limits of the players and providing opportunities for better learning. In addition, hacking competitions are a great opportunity for recruiting new talent: CTF participants are highly skilled, well-motivated, and hard-working, which are great traits for a future employee.
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Spotlight

FOR ENTERPRISES TODAY, RANSOMWARE ATTACKS ARE A MATTER OF “WHEN,” NOT “IF” Ransomware attacks are intensifying in scale and sophistication. A recent NTT Security survey revealed that ransomware attacks rose 350 percent in 2017 over the previous year.1 Nearly 75% of companies infected with ransomware suffer two days or more without access to their files while 33% go five days or longer.2 Global damage costs from ransomware attacks are predicted to reach $11.5 billion annually by 2019.3 The NotPetya ransomware attack on TNT Express in 2017 cost FedEx $300M and took the IT team more than a month to recover to its normal operational state.

OTHER ON-DEMAND WEBINARS

Key Insights Into Today's Risk Management Landscape

BitSight

Today, cyber risk management affects organizations of all sizes across all industries. With data breaches on the rise and sensitive client information increasingly at risk, businesses need to elevate their existing risk management strategies to become more comprehensive. To proactively mitigate risk, organizations need to create a lasting risk management program that can scale with the growth of their business and sustain the changing risk landscape.
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Machine Learning in Cybersecurity

Nopsec

Machine Learning in cybersecurity webinar presented by Sanja Nedic. THIS WEBINAR COVERED. Core concepts behind machine learning and main types of problems it can solve. Examples of real-world uses of machine learning in security to augment or replace rule-based or heuristic solutions to problems such as spam detection, intrusion detection, malware analysis, vulnerability prioritization, etc. Challenges of building reliable machine learning systems in security space.
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Bug Bounties and How They Help

Trend Micro

Once a vulnerability becomes known to cybercriminals, the race is on for vendors to create a patch before it is exploited. And with the regular use of exploits in attacks and threats like the WannaCry ransomware using a vulnerability, getting the win has never been so crucial. This month we will cover the bug bounty marketplace, including the different types of markets available to vulnerability researchers. As well, we will review Trend Micro Research and how their research can benefit organizations through responsible disclosure and pre-disclosed filters to virtually patch vulnerabilities.
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Improving AppSec With Application Security Posture Management

By now, everyone has heard of the *AST scanning technologies. Most have been around for 15+ years, yet organizations are still struggling to eliminate AppSec issues like SQL injection and XSS vulnerabilities because these scanning tools look at vulnerabilities through a vulnerability lens, not a contextual risk lens.
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Spotlight

FOR ENTERPRISES TODAY, RANSOMWARE ATTACKS ARE A MATTER OF “WHEN,” NOT “IF” Ransomware attacks are intensifying in scale and sophistication. A recent NTT Security survey revealed that ransomware attacks rose 350 percent in 2017 over the previous year.1 Nearly 75% of companies infected with ransomware suffer two days or more without access to their files while 33% go five days or longer.2 Global damage costs from ransomware attacks are predicted to reach $11.5 billion annually by 2019.3 The NotPetya ransomware attack on TNT Express in 2017 cost FedEx $300M and took the IT team more than a month to recover to its normal operational state.

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