Machine Learning in Cybersecurity

Machine Learning in cybersecurity webinar presented by Sanja Nedic. THIS WEBINAR COVERED. Core concepts behind machine learning and main types of problems it can solve. Examples of real-world uses of machine learning in security to augment or replace rule-based or heuristic solutions to problems such as spam detection, intrusion detection, malware analysis, vulnerability prioritization, etc. Challenges of building reliable machine learning systems in security space.
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Spotlight

Organizations are losing IT and security control Once upon a time, IT and security teams focused mostly on managing their organization’s on-prem environment. But as business requirements changed, customer bases became global, and remote work took root, these technology teams were handed responsibility across more domains: cloud

OTHER ON-DEMAND WEBINARS

Identity Security on the Rails: Simple Solutions to Disrupt Identity-Based Attacks

In today’s distributed work environment, Identity is the new perimeter, so it should come as no surprise that attackers consider identities both on-premises and in the cloud as High-Value Targets. With a valid identity, attackers can move laterally, escalate privileges, identify critical servers, and execute damaging attacks. Fortunately, Identity Security addresses identity risks and detects identity-based attacks.
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Practical Risk Management Steps for the Threat Hunter

Simplilearn

What is threat hunting and why is this field gaining popularity among security organizations? Threat hunting emphasizes on a proactive approach to security and encourages organizations to anticipate and manage potential security breaches and hacks. Join Dr. James Stanger, Sr Director of Products at CompTIA, in a live webinar as he walks us through the critical areas of threat hunting and how this can enhance current cyber security measures for organizations.
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Is GDPR Working? Lessons from Data & the Field

BitSight

Find out what data tells us about the effectiveness of GDPR. After years of debate over whether to impose new cybersecurity regulations on companies, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) went into effect in Europe in May 2018. Already we’re seeing data breach victims ordered to pay fines under the new rules, and cookie disclosure notices are popping up on more websites than ever.
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Cybersecurity in a Changed World: 2021 Trends and 2022 Predictions

If 2020 seemed like an anomaly, 2021 proved to us that it’s time to get comfortable with the transformed reality. Remote work, intended as a temporary response to COVID-19, is now an increasingly standardized way to operate. With face-to-face operations no longer the norm, numerous organizations have shifted to a technology-driven strategy. We’ve seen a rise in initiatives like self-service or online purchases, as well as an upturn in remote events, with many new or established conferences choosing to go virtual. Businesses are also investing in technology more than ever, growing their IT infrastructure with new software and IoT devices. However, as can be expected, new or enhanced cybersecurity threats went hand and hand with this unexpected digital renaissance.
Watch Now

Spotlight

Organizations are losing IT and security control Once upon a time, IT and security teams focused mostly on managing their organization’s on-prem environment. But as business requirements changed, customer bases became global, and remote work took root, these technology teams were handed responsibility across more domains: cloud

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