Why IT Security and Project Mgmt. Training Will Be Key in 2017

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During this webcast, RedVector Senior Director of Product Management Bobby Person outlines the reasons why organizations must protect data and streamline projects, and provides training strategies to get started. Discover how your project managers, IT developers, software engineers and others can manage projects and resources to exceed expectations, mitigate network attacks and vulnerabilities, and earn important industry credentials and certifications using new project management training and IT infrastructure/security training.
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Spotlight

This paper reports on a trade study we performed to support the development of a Cyber ontology from an initial malware ontology. The goals of the Cyber ontology effort are first described, followed by a discussion of the ontology development methodology used. The main body of the paper then follows, which is a description of the potential ontologies and standards that could be utilized to extend the Cyber ontology from its initially constrained malware focus. These resources include, in particular, Cyber and malware standards, schemas, and terminologies that directly contributed to the initial malware ontology effort. Other resources are upper (sometimes called 'foundational') ontologies. Core concepts that any Cyber ontology will extend have already been identified and rigorously defined in these foundational ontologies. However, for lack of space, this section is profoundly reduced. In addition, utility ontologies that are focused on time, geospatial, person, events, and network operations are briefly described. These utility ontologies can be viewed as specialized super-domain or even mid-level ontologies, since they span many, if not most, ontologies -- including any Cyber ontology. An overall view of the ontological architecture used by the trade study is also given. The report on the trade study concludes with some proposed next steps in the iterative evolution of the Cyber ontology.

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Is GDPR Working? Lessons from Data & the Field

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Spotlight

This paper reports on a trade study we performed to support the development of a Cyber ontology from an initial malware ontology. The goals of the Cyber ontology effort are first described, followed by a discussion of the ontology development methodology used. The main body of the paper then follows, which is a description of the potential ontologies and standards that could be utilized to extend the Cyber ontology from its initially constrained malware focus. These resources include, in particular, Cyber and malware standards, schemas, and terminologies that directly contributed to the initial malware ontology effort. Other resources are upper (sometimes called 'foundational') ontologies. Core concepts that any Cyber ontology will extend have already been identified and rigorously defined in these foundational ontologies. However, for lack of space, this section is profoundly reduced. In addition, utility ontologies that are focused on time, geospatial, person, events, and network operations are briefly described. These utility ontologies can be viewed as specialized super-domain or even mid-level ontologies, since they span many, if not most, ontologies -- including any Cyber ontology. An overall view of the ontological architecture used by the trade study is also given. The report on the trade study concludes with some proposed next steps in the iterative evolution of the Cyber ontology.

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